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  #11  
Old 01-02-2017, 10:17 AM
o7oBaseMetal o7oBaseMetal is offline
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Kind of an overgeneralized question if you ask me.

Different processes and their applications have different hazards.

I would recommend having a fire extinguisher within reasonable distance...

I normally go with minimal ppe necessary. I almost always wear a welding hood but sometimes only a lens held in front of my eyes with my mouth. If it isn't too hot I will wear long sleeves or if it is too hot I will wear the best sunscreen I can get. Sometimes I wear gloves; especially if I am doing something that spattered. I usually wear safety toe boots but not to protect against welding as much as just being around heavy stuff that could potentially fall on my foot. If I am on a jobsite with a strict safety policy I will wear safety glasses in addition to the Z87 clear safety lens that already exists in my welding hood. If I am welding at heights I will wear a safety harness with either a lanyard or a retractable cable depending on what makes more sense. Sometimes it will be required to wear a hard hat so I will mount my welding hood to a hard hat; this should be done when overhead hazards are present or when a jobsite requires it because somebody who rides a desk for a living thinks you are too stupid to figure it out on your own
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  #12  
Old 01-02-2017, 02:37 PM
Allen B. Allen B. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dubby View Post

Yeah, so are the rest of us. We throw the offending piece of clothing off and run around screaming like a ninny. Stop, drop, and roll are for folks with floor space. I'd stop, drop and get stuck and would be burned and still couldn't get back up.

Little quickie jobs get whatever is handy. At least a hood (Jackson with Solara unit), the first left glove I find, and I run the leaf blower to chase the dust off the floor. If I need more than that I seriously overestimated the job and didn't charge enough.

When I really plan it out, I do the above, but make sure I put boots on and usually a long-sleeved Dickies shop shirt.
I was a fire explorer, so I know a lot more than most kids my age or younger (14-21 allowed in the post). I know just about every way to use a fire extinguisher, which ones to use and how to ACTUALLY put out a fire. No one other than firefighters really know how to put one out. There's a lot more to it than just dowsing it in water or retardant. There's a whole huge process that needs to be taken, for safety and otherwise. I personally think that every welder should have to take their state's Fire Basic class to learn EXACTLY how to put out a fire in the shop. Because most people don't even know how to use an extinguisher properly or even the different types of extinguishers!

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  #13  
Old 01-02-2017, 05:07 PM
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terry lingle terry lingle is offline
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You make a rather large presumption here
By the time you get enough experience to be an effective worker you will have enough to use a fire extinguisher correctly and know when it is time to bail and let the fire department handle the situation.
I ran my own shop for 30 years was a volunteer fireman for 3 before I went to university as were many other members here.
Even so I got to attend fire response training several times as a prerequisite to working on a given site.
Current tickets were no exemption the plant policy was attend our course or go home. It was a good policy because it made sure every one on the site knew the site specific details such as locations of alarms,equipment and muster points in the event of a fire or other emergency.
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  #14  
Old 01-02-2017, 05:56 PM
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There are plenty of guys out there who can build a fire with a welding rod, and can't put it out.
I know that during mine rescue training we were taught how to put out a burning pan of diesel. Armed with a 20 lb Ansul, it is still quite an achievement to get that sucker subdued. Wood/paper is easier than a vaporizing fuel.
I never was that good at it.
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  #15  
Old 01-02-2017, 05:57 PM
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greywynd greywynd is offline
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I can't tell you how many times I've had 'extinguisher training' at various jobs. I know the one place I worked at, with diecasting different metals, we got lots of practice.

Worst one was a hydraulic leak onto a meltpot, took over 20 extinguishers to fully put out the oil leak and hydraulic hoses, wiring etc that caught fire.

I think in the end I'd also put out 5 or 6 Magnesium fires, using either granular flux, or a couple times the class D extinguishers. Those get expensive in a hurry.

As far as safety gear, usually it's welding helmet, coveralls and boots, or work pants and a t-shirt, maybe a cotton jacket, and overhead or nasty spots the leather jacket may come out.

Gloves depend on the job and type of welding.

Two thumb typing on a phone, as I never have time to use a computer!
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  #16  
Old 01-02-2017, 07:02 PM
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midmosandblasting midmosandblasting is offline
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Yes our plant won't even take a fire fighter 1 cert ,still take the damn training.
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  #17  
Old 01-02-2017, 07:25 PM
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When I was working heavy equipment I would wear jeans and a t-shirt..
When I was working on structural steel I would wear jeans and a t-shirt..
When I am parked on the couch, like now, I wear jeans and a t-shirt.

Most times during summer months I wore gloves with about half of the fingers cut off. Lots of times tools or steel was too hot to pick up and hold so the little gloves came in handy. If it's 120deg F in the shade and you lay your framing square down for a minute it gets too hot to pick up.

I would stick or mig for small projects with cut off gloves, I would just curl my fingers under and wouldn't get burned.They protected my palms as well, splits in the callous on the palms hurts. If I had to weld a lot or with heavy wire I used the big gloves and leather sleeves, most times..I also had some of the green sleeves, I don't know what that material was but it didn't burn easy.

Working down in the SoCal desert with leather sleeves on , they would be pretty wet and salty when I took them off. I would most times hose them off when I got back to the shop and just hang them out to dry overnight.
When it's 100F at midnight and 5% humidity they dried pretty quick.
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  #18  
Old 01-02-2017, 07:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironman View Post
There are plenty of guys out there who can build a fire with a welding rod, and can't put it out.
I know that during mine rescue training we were taught how to put out a burning pan of diesel..
On one jobsite I was living on, in Thousand Oaks CA, we had the old Ford fuel truck catch fire. The guy driving it stalled it going up a little rise in the road and it backfired through the carb. He tried putting it out but used up all the fire bottles on the truck without success.

By the time he got to me, about a quarter mile away, and I got on the radio, it was a lost cause. Watching 3000 gallons of fuel burn off is kinda neat

Another time I happened to see a D-8 catch fire, the mech had done some welding on it and had left, I just caught a flicker of flame with a side glance. There was a lot of dried leaves and twigs under the fuel tank and that's what caught... I got to it in a minute or so and handled it..it was a little bit of excitement for a while. ..
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  #19  
Old 01-02-2017, 07:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Allen B. View Post
I was a fire explorer, so I know a lot more than most kids my age or younger (14-21 allowed in the post). I know just about every way to use a fire extinguisher, which ones to use and how to ACTUALLY put out a fire. No one other than firefighters really know how to put one out. There's a lot more to it than just dowsing it in water or retardant. There's a whole huge process that needs to be taken, for safety and otherwise. I personally think that every welder should have to take their state's Fire Basic class to learn EXACTLY how to put out a fire in the shop. Because most people don't even know how to use an extinguisher properly or even the different types of extinguishers!

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So, I am curious, how old are you? How much real world experience do you really have? It sorta seems like you have a lot of opinions but what did you form them on?

Have you ever even had a job? If so, what was it?

Most of the folks on this site have been around the block a time or two, probably helped build the block in the first place.

If you come here with a little humility and ask sincerely you can get a ton of info. ..

If you come here and boldly state how you know all there is to know and call real men stupid because they have been doing something longer than you've been alive, well, you won't get far...
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2017, 04:30 AM
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For anything more than a few tacks I'll always try and get sleeves. Burned myself pretty badly when I was younger from the top of the gauntlet to the bottom of the T shirt sleeve. blisters and all. used a nice bit of aloe vera to cool that down.


Pretty much always wear gauntlets and a shield, would hardly do a tack without that much.
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