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  #11  
Old 01-30-2013, 03:14 PM
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Most people reach for silver solder when soft solder is more than adequate. Since I quit doing AC work I can count on one hand the times I have used silver solder..
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  #12  
Old 02-03-2013, 01:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shopsmith View Post
I'm trying to unconfuse myself. I understand the basic difference in silver content like 3.8%, 9%, 15%, 45%, 56%. But what are the typical melting points? And maybe the purpose of each. For example which would be better for a brass to brass, or an aluminum to aluminum? I keep researching and I get wide swings in temps for the same content silver rods or wire. Maybe thats the other metals included. I keep seeing silver solder used but maybe a suggestion on which to use typically for basic steel to steel, brass to brass or copper and alum to alum would help. Just a bit uninformed about which works where and the temps. I saw the charts at Airgas and it helped clear the fog a little but the alum with the alum flux is a stumper.
I was just going over this material because I got interested in ERCuSi-A Mig brazing.

I came across this site. Clicking on a product give you access to the technical data such as the intended use, which metals it will join, the safety data, etc.

I used to do quite a lot of high silver content brazing/silver soldering with an air/natural gas torch to join surgical stainless steel.

The labs now use a LASER welder which is better tolerated by the body and stronger as well.

Hope this helps.

DrBob
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  #13  
Old 02-03-2013, 01:50 PM
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From what I've read and used, there is no need for silver solder unless you are working with high pressures. What application are you looking at using it for?
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  #14  
Old 02-03-2013, 06:03 PM
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I continue to see it used for tying different materials together. For example, I had to make a fitting for mc cable. Not make so much as customize. The fitting wouldn't mount properly into the metal receptacle box.so I had to first enlarge the hole in the box to receive the fitting. Then mounted the fitting to the box for a shitty fit. So it's here that I would have used silver solder but instead used some other that I had. The fitting was alum? and the box steel.
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  #15  
Old 02-03-2013, 06:43 PM
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Silver solder requires a close fit.
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  #16  
Old 02-03-2013, 08:01 PM
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Default No close fitup needed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by moe1942 View Post
Silver solder requires a close fit.
Not so, Moe. You can easily jump a 1/4" gap with silver solder by the simple trick of heating the part of the joint you want the solder drawn to. In fact I understand that the fitup spec for MIG brazing is to leave a gap the width of the wire you are using (in my case .035). I have ordered some CuSi-A wire and I'll post some of my results.

DrBob
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  #17  
Old 02-03-2013, 09:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrBob View Post
Not so, Moe. You can easily jump a 1/4" gap with silver solder by the simple trick of heating the part of the joint you want the solder drawn to. In fact I understand that the fitup spec for MIG brazing is to leave a gap the width of the wire you are using (in my case .035). I have ordered some CuSi-A wire and I'll post some of my results.

DrBob
Bob

1/4" ...that is a Huge gap...

I would be very interested in seeing pics of your efforts...

are we sure we are speaking of silver solder and not silver braze?
if it is to be used with MIG.. I would guess it to be braze..

was taught that a tight fitup was required and my jewelry experience has confirmed that ... silver solder with torch and flux is extremely fluid.. and has very poor gap filling properties

I believe that MOE is correct..
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Last edited by H80N; 02-03-2013 at 11:20 PM.
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  #18  
Old 02-03-2013, 09:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt_Wheaton View Post
Rio Grande Jewelers supply has a great selection and alot of info. It is correct that the higher the silver content, the higher the melting point. I use both 56% and 65%. I don't think you'll be soldering aluminum together with this method though.

One other thing; your going to pay out the Ass at the local welding supply. Give Rio Grande a try. You can buy it by the ounce or the foot. They also sell handy flux which is good through the higher temp ranges. http://www.riogrande.com

http://www.riogrande.com/Category/To...28/Silver/4446
Matt

Rio is a great place... I have used them a lot..over many years...
and especially when I was in ABQ and could go to their store..
there is a lot of info in their catalogs... too...
here is an old thread..

http://shopfloortalk.com/forums/show...nde#post458161
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Last edited by H80N; 02-03-2013 at 11:06 PM.
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