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Old 03-04-2007, 06:36 PM
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Default Cat 988 bucket

I am not trying to sell anything here but what you see in the pictures are carbide patches with a mild steel backing. They beat the hell out of hard surfacing We don't uses hard surfacing at all any more, its not bad if you can do it outside where you can get some air but in a closed shop those fumes will kill you plus most of the repair is done in the winter. You have to put three passes one atop the other to get 100% hard surfacing, all I could ever stand is two. I know a lot of you have your own business and get paid by the hour and these would cut your time by at least 3/4s. and you wouldn't see your customer again for some time but it wouldn't take long for the word to get around how long your buckets are lasting. The old patches on the 988 bucket have 750,000 ton over them and very little ware. And the bucket sees a lot of abuse. The 330 cat excavator has one season on it and the patches were put on when it was brand new. The 988 bucket was done in a day. The patches run about $5.00 apiece.
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Old 03-04-2007, 06:38 PM
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Old 03-04-2007, 06:57 PM
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have a link or the makers name? $5 apiece seems steep but then again buy a roll of hardface
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Old 03-04-2007, 07:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigman250
have a link or the makers name? $5 apiece seems steep but then again buy a roll of hardface
I will find out tomorrow if I can remember. The time saved and longer service is the key and easy to replace.
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Old 03-04-2007, 09:28 PM
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I saw some similar ones once, but they weren't priced that good. I would be interested in some of those.
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Old 03-05-2007, 10:03 AM
Snidley Snidley is offline
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Digr:

When the carbide/steel backed patches wear down and it's time to put some new ones on - do you grind/cut the old ones off or just weld the new ones on top?
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Old 03-05-2007, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snidley
Digr:

When the carbide/steel backed patches wear down and it's time to put some new ones on - do you grind/cut the old ones off or just weld the new ones on top?
You have to lop them off, works best that way too as they never wear evenly enough to just weld ontop, and customers get a little testy when they start popping off. The high chromium content makes them a pain to cut though, so you always try to make sure that you install them in such a way that you can easily burn or CAC gouge out the welds. I have been told that Plasma works well on Chromium Carbide, but I haven't used it myself on them. You can get them precut from a decent supplier. They cost more than $5 ea up here, so Digr is getting a good price on them IMO. I use Trimay but Clad technologies is another company to buy from.

I find that most people don't match their hardsrufacing consumables to the proper application, and therefore often see shortened lifespans. There's a reason that companies like Stoody literally have hundreds of different hard surfacing consumables. Cladded plates aka shroud plates are good depending on the material being processed, and usually the larger the implement, the better the benefits, but sometimes they are not an economical choice and almost always are used in conjunction with proper hardsurfacing consumables.
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Old 03-05-2007, 06:51 PM
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I was wrong about the price they are under $3.50 apiece and can be easily cut with a plasma and we remove them with a torch. We used to use Stoody wire which is a great product but time consuming and the fumes are hard on the body. These patches are chromium carbide and the Minnesota rep is Jim Pauling 218-721-3531 Tri Con metals. Try them you will like them!
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Old 03-06-2007, 02:05 AM
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My former boss and I took a look at something like that once, but he said there were to expensive, I know they were way more than what digr got his for, can't remember the price but he decided agianst them. They didn't look the same either, the ones the salesman hade was round and had humps that stuck up on them, so maybe that was the reason for the higher price. He also wouldn't use a air arc cause he said he was faster with a torch

James
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Old 03-06-2007, 02:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jksweld
My former boss and I took a look at something like that once, but he said there were to expensive, I know they were way more than what digr got his for, can't remember the price but he decided agianst them. They didn't look the same either, the ones the salesman hade was round and had humps that stuck up on them, so maybe that was the reason for the higher price. He also wouldn't use a air arc cause he said he was faster with a torch

James
I know the buttons you are talking about, they seem to be common in concrete and rock crushing applications, I'm not sure why, but my $0.50 thought would be that the spherical / dome shape makes them stronger to crushing forces from the top down. I haven't bought those before, they've been customer supplied.
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