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  #11  
Old 12-15-2013, 03:19 PM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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The first thing would be make sure the problem is not the house breaker, if need be buy a new breaker.
After all the welder is rated at 19.5 amps.

some breakers can be effected by heat an over heated breaker may trip at less then its rating.

Breakers have a time rating,
in other words a 20 amp breaker may have a trip time of 1 minute at full load and at 40 amps one mili second.
that's also saying, pulling 18 amps may trip a 20 amp breaker in a longer time, maybe 10 minutes.

Some of the letters on the breakers usually refer to motor duty and have a longer time delay, you will have to search the web to find out how to un-code the letters.
Breakers for air conditioners usually have a longer delay.

If you have an amp clamp measure the line amps at full load when you are welding.
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  #12  
Old 12-15-2013, 03:37 PM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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Quote:
Hopefully after you take a look Gwiz will be back.
I'm, trying to help a new member so there Will be a delay on my part.

start with the house breaker.
Your not tripping the breaker inside the welder so we need to start with the house breaker.

possible but Unlikely the board. looks like a high current problem, boards will generally burn up with that high of a draw so we start looking at the high power parts.

Be careful of C1 a very large capacitor that can store power like a car battery.
I don't see it in any or the pictures maybe its in-between the two heat-sink plates (four diodes mount to the plates).
most of the time there is a bleed down resistor to discharge the cap but I don't see it in the schematic.
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Last edited by GWIZ; 12-15-2013 at 03:48 PM.
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  #13  
Old 12-15-2013, 04:28 PM
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cutter cutter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graybeard62 View Post

I am starting to wonder if the problem is the welder. I ran it on a 15 amp circuit yesterday for a short time, no problems.

The problem at the customers house with the multiple popping of curcuit can be explained with the loose ground connection.

The occasional problem in my garage - I've always thought that the GE 20 amp breakers that feed the garage popped easily.
In my experience, residential circuit breakers decay over time so the older they are they more likely this is to occur.
Some of them will trip under considerably less than their rated load, some will not trip no matter what and sooner or later, some of them will trip one final time and refuse to reset.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
The first thing would be make sure the problem is not the house breaker, if need be buy a new breaker.
After all the welder is rated at 19.5 amps.
A new 20 amp breaker should be one of the quickest and least expensive tests you can do.
When you think about it, a welder presents a pretty heavy demand on a 120v circuit due to the frequent arc starts - we tend to weld a couple of inches, stop for a few seconds to reposition ourselves or the work piece & pull the trigger again, over & over in a fairly short time frame.
That's probably a real good way to piss off a tired old breaker.

A 30 amp 240 v circuit would really be a much better way to approach the situation.

Don, what kind/grade/rating of extension cord are you using? That can make a big difference too.
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  #14  
Old 12-15-2013, 06:06 PM
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In my experience with a smaller welder, it is usually the diodes that crap out.
My dad has a Hobart 220v mig that ATE diodes until we got him some rated for a much higher duty cycle, and a higher peak voltage. What was happening is he would get power spikes that would take out the diodes.
That is just an example of what often happens. The diodes are fairly easy to check, you just have to remove the wiring to them to test. Make sure you mark each wire for where it goes before you remove them!!!
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  #15  
Old 12-16-2013, 01:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
............When you think about it, a welder presents a pretty heavy demand on a 120v circuit due to the frequent arc starts - we tend to weld a couple of inches, stop for a few seconds to reposition ourselves or the work piece & pull the trigger again, over & over in a fairly short time frame.
That's probably a real good way to piss off a tired old breaker................
I have a breaker in the sub panel in my garage that is tripping at less than rated load, but it is caused by my chop saw, not my stick welder. It will work fine for a few cuts, then trip the next time the switch on the saw is pressed.
The central vacuum in the house will also do this occasionally.
Once I can find one or two of those round tuits, both breakers will have to be replaced.
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