Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Welding

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 06-11-2004, 01:05 AM
Franz Franz is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 5,731
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MAC702
Hey Franz,
Remember for whom WD-40 was invented?
Geez Mac, give me a break, I remembered the important stuff.
Besides, WD 40 SUCKS compared to CRC 5-56.
Now that we have a Ladies Room on the board, when will Amy be arriving?
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 06-11-2004, 10:21 AM
Fla Jim's Avatar
Fla Jim Fla Jim is offline
Harbor Freight Backslider
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: West Central Florida
Posts: 2,553
Default

Don't use WD 40 on anything that has a tight clearence. It leaves some kind of a "Brown looking residue"when it dries. It will cause equipment to bind up.
I'm partial to "LPS" products
__________________
Jim the Shop Rat
From Jim’s Magic Garage®

How a politician stands on the Second Amendment tells you how he or she views you as an individual... as a trustworthy and productive citizen, or as part of an unruly crowd that needs to be lorded over, controlled, supervised, and taken care of.
???'?? ???'?
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 06-11-2004, 10:53 AM
Markopolo's Avatar
Markopolo Markopolo is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: West-central Florida
Posts: 1,833
Default

DAMN ! . . .guess I'll have to get out of the "good old days" and try some of these new products. I use WD40 on everything. The guy at the welding store even told me to spray in on steel before mig welding. (he said that it's exactly the same thing as them "high falutin'" anti-spatter sprays, just cheaper. And already 2 of you said other products work better ! THANKS !
__________________
Director of Equipment (by appointment)
"I'll be the LAST person to let you down"
Jezynowka !
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 06-11-2004, 11:18 AM
'Ol Pilot
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default 'Ol Pilot

Couple of things here. In the bearing world, there are channeling and non-channeling greases. For ball bearings, channeling greases are normally preferred since they don't try to flow back between the balls and heat up.

FlaJim alluded to a very good point - when repacking a bearing race after flushing it out, typically a 40% grease fill should be used. Excessive amounts of grease will cause churning and excessive heating, which then evaporates the lighter fractions of the grease, eventually leading to "coking" of the bearing and failure.

I usually chase off any aircraft mechanic I find with a can of WD-40 or confiscate it. The reason? Commercial aircraft use a non-flammable hydraulic fluid, Skydrol, which is phosphate ester based, as opposed to the old super flammable red MIL-5606 hydraulic fluid (which, by the way, has a flash point 200 degrees less than jet fuel!). But Skydrol requires special O rings and seals, made of ethylene propolene (EPR) rubber. WD-40 attacks EPR and causes it to swell. You can imagine what happens when some idiot sprays around an airplane and gets WD-40 on exposed actuators, etc.

Mixing of greases is another no-no! Two greases may meet the same MIL-Spec and either one may work very well by itself. But they may have entirely different thickeners which are not compatible. When mixed they may form gritty hard products. Some years ago an Alaskan Airlines MD-80 crashed off the coast of CA. Maintenance had swapped from Aeroshell 7 to Mobil 28 for periodic lubrication of the horizontal stabilizer acme trim jackscrew without doing a thorough flushing. Both greases met the same Mil-Spec and were singley approved for that application. However, the concrete-like products that formed from the mixture eventually damaged the acme nut which stripped and all elevator control was lost.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 06-11-2004, 11:46 AM
Fla Jim's Avatar
Fla Jim Fla Jim is offline
Harbor Freight Backslider
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: West Central Florida
Posts: 2,553
Default

Ol pilot your right. I used to get aggravated When I found out some salesman selling "Supergrease" convinced a customer to use his grease, and added it to a motor, or gear box without flushing out the old. ""But he said his was compatible with "all" greases"" was what I heard, as I was changing bearings.
__________________
Jim the Shop Rat
From Jim’s Magic Garage®

How a politician stands on the Second Amendment tells you how he or she views you as an individual... as a trustworthy and productive citizen, or as part of an unruly crowd that needs to be lorded over, controlled, supervised, and taken care of.
???'?? ???'?
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 06-11-2004, 11:50 AM
Jake's Avatar
Jake Jake is offline
Holder of only Official Titles
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: North of Pile Buck
Posts: 1,256
Default

so here is a question...(another one) what is a good solvent? just good old diesel fuel? or I have a jumbo bucket of zylene...(not so good if you want nice moist hands)

ok, 2 questions...and, where does one get CRC 5-56 and LPS products?
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 06-11-2004, 11:51 AM
Fla Jim's Avatar
Fla Jim Fla Jim is offline
Harbor Freight Backslider
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: West Central Florida
Posts: 2,553
Default

I mostly use mineral spirits.
__________________
Jim the Shop Rat
From Jim’s Magic Garage®

How a politician stands on the Second Amendment tells you how he or she views you as an individual... as a trustworthy and productive citizen, or as part of an unruly crowd that needs to be lorded over, controlled, supervised, and taken care of.
???'?? ???'?
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 06-11-2004, 12:07 PM
Jake's Avatar
Jake Jake is offline
Holder of only Official Titles
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: North of Pile Buck
Posts: 1,256
Default

Are Mineral Spirits little minerals who have sold their souls to the devil?

Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 06-11-2004, 12:56 PM
'Ol Pilot
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default 'Ol Pilot

Lest anyone think I came down too hard on WD-40, there really are uses for it.

First and foremost, it's a great tar and bug remover for your car. Beats the junk sold specifically for that purpose.

Second, it's a good temporary rust preventer on powered and non powered garden tools, such as electric hedge trimmers, pruners, tree saws, etc. Spray 'em down after you use 'em to prevent the sap and plant juices from doing a number on them. Keeps your Lawn Nazi happy. And when you put your two-stroke equipment up for the season, squirt some in the carb and give a few yanks (disconnect the plug lead first, some two strokes will actually run on this stuff.)

Like FlaJim, I like LPS products (Holt Industries, GA). LPS-3 used to be the gold standard for prevention of airframe corrosion. I like their new Procyon even better. You won't find it at Home Depot or Lowes, but many of the smaller independent hardware stores stock it or an equivalent. CRC is also good. Both form a thin, waxy soft film to lock out moisture. Both are excellent on interior surfaces, but neither will last in direct sunlight - they aren't paint.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 06-11-2004, 07:24 PM
Shade Tree Welder's Avatar
Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
Grumpy Bastard
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Kankakee County, IL
Posts: 19,612
Default WD-40 and solvents.

WD-40, I do not recommend it.

1) I contains relatively high levels of silicone. Try getting a good paint job on steel after using it for rust prevention or anti spatter. Solvents will not remove the silicone. The silicone is for the dewatering properties

2) Its rust preventive qualities are poor compared to many other products on the market. For example, Henkel's Prevox RP 6041 CR, Castrol's Rustilo DW 924HF and LPS #3 to mention a few I like. (I have no experience with the CRC Products)

3) It has a relatively low flash point, <140F. We all have welders and torches so the flash point of a solvent is a concern.

4) It's shelf life is less than a year.

5) And you should always shake before using as the components separate on standing.


Solvents

Diesel fuel is not the best solvent, although its is relatively cheap and available with a high flash point, >210F. I use it, mainly because I have a bulk tank relatively near my shop on the farm. K-1 Kerosene is a little better and still has a relatively high flash point, >210F.

You must always becareful of solvents and their flash points. The hazards with gasoline (flash pt. -50 F), white gas (Coleman lantern fuel, flash is similar to gasoline) and acetone (FP 0 F) are often taken too lightly due to there common use.

Xylene (C8H10) has a flash point of ~77F but is toxic and a known carcinogen. 'nuf said there.
__________________
Shade

"Prepare to defend yourselves."
-- Sergeant Major Basil L. Plumley, Ia Drang Valley

Last edited by Shade Tree Welder; 06-11-2004 at 07:27 PM. Reason: grammar and spelling
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.