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  #11  
Old 05-10-2019, 03:11 PM
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1. I will get you some pictures later.
2. Retaining nut??? Who used that old tech anymore...
3. Your backing pad might be too soft or worn out.
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  #12  
Old 05-10-2019, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post


3. Your backing pad might be too soft or worn out.

Never liked a backing plate, I just used 2 sanding discs, smooth side together. I had to grind some of the shaft down because 2 disc use much less space than the backplate but that was no big deal.

Having a grit available worked pretty good for some tight areas, plus it gave me a second disc if I needed to swap out for a sharper one. A lot of times I ran a 50/36 combo...
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  #13  
Old 05-11-2019, 06:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
Hmmmmm, I must be doing something wrong my discs wear out evenly across the face...


I guess everyone is different in how they use their tools. Depends on the situation being used. There was times that I only used the edge cleaning up welds in handrails. No room for the whole pad.


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  #14  
Old 05-11-2019, 11:13 AM
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Can’t recall the last time I used a sanding disc on an angle grinder. Flap wheels are what I use if grinding is more than needed.

I do use 2” and 3” sanding discs on my disc grinders though, not worth trying to trim them though.


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  #15  
Old 05-11-2019, 11:20 AM
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Well fuck...guess I'll shit can my trimeez.....
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  #16  
Old 05-11-2019, 11:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
...Retaining nut??? Who used that old tech anymore...
How else are you going to hold a sanding disc?

Quote:
Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
...There was times that I only used the edge cleaning up welds in handrails. No room for the whole pad...
Yup, we've used up lots of discs where only the outer 3/4" or so was worn out--just depends on how you're using them. On wide flat surfaces like tanks or boxes you can often use the whole face but not always.

Still not worth trimming them though. Can't justify the time and you also end up with a disc that is smaller and has lower peripheral speed--they don't work nearly as well the second time around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
Can’t recall the last time I used a sanding disc on an angle grinder. Flap wheels are what I use if grinding is more than needed...
Flap wheel or flap disc? The former are good for fine finishing in tight quarters. A flap disc is used like a sanding disc. They'll remove a lot of material in hurry if you have the right grit. First pic is a flap wheel. Second is a flap disc.

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...Well fuck...guess I'll shit can my trimeez...
Moe, it ain't just a case of what others think or do; it's all about what works for you...
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  #17  
Old 05-11-2019, 04:00 PM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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Morgan makes body shop tools. We had several of those same exact trimmers in the body shops at the Ford dealer and the Chevy dealer I worked for in the early 70's.

The dented metal was pushed, pulled, hammered and massaged to a nearly strait condition. Then the paint had to be removed before bondo was applied. The metal was not completely smooth and flat, it always had a lot of small divots that needed the paint completely removed from before filler was applied. Also needed the coarse sanding marks to give the surface some tooth for the mud to stick to. The only way to get to the bottom (never more than an 1/8 inch) was the outside edge of a flexible disc which didn't last long. The trimmer would give a new cutting edge to the almost new disc when it was worn away. We always used the angled side of the cutting wheel because it gave the edge of the disc a bunch of high spots that would get down into the low spots of the panel better.

The shop always bought 9 inch discs and we would use them down to about 5 inches by cutting away the outside. In a body shop application you would never use the face of a 36 grit disc because if the metal was straight there were other sanders that would remove paint without leaving the deep scratches.

We used depressed center backing discs that were made of a light brown fiberous material that looked a little like phenolic, but was flexible while still pretty rigid. Plastic was usually too soft to support the edge of the disc very well.

It is my understanding that current practice is now to use a self etching primer on the bare metal before applying filler. That sounds like a good thing, but was not available when I was in the trade.

It's an excellent tool Moe, perfect for what it was designed for. Don't let these heavy metal advocates try to tell you any different. Give them a 15 pound 9 inch grinder with a 1/4 inch rigid disc and let them throw sparks all over their shop. Haha, we'll use our disc trimmers for what they were designed for.
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  #18  
Old 05-11-2019, 04:01 PM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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Found the backers we used.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/S-G-TOOL-AI...frcectupt=true
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  #19  
Old 05-11-2019, 04:18 PM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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An old pair of snips that you don't care how dull they get will trim discs too. Just not as satisfying as using the real deal.
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  #20  
Old 05-12-2019, 09:54 AM
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Pictures finally...

When using type 1 wheels, sanding or grinding discs, you angle of attach
should never be more than 15°, ideally around 10° degrees. Most backing
pads are designed to apply even pressure across the face of the abrasive
that way.

I have 24 throu 120 grit discs, and the last picture is a Bear-tex disc,
Bear-tex is Norton's version of scotch brite. They are reinforced for using
on a grinder and are great for polishing.

The disc snap on with out tools and require just a 60° turn to lock. And
they last a reasonable time.

I will often use a flap disc or vitrified wheel to remove the majority of the
stock and they use these for final finishing and blending. With the holes in
the disc you can see what you are grinding. Quite nice.
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