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Old 02-20-2012, 08:20 PM
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Default Writeup/Info on drill bits?

Since I will be the owner of a drill press this weekend I am searching for information as to drill bits, their use and types and how to care for them and keep them in good shape.

Is there such a writeup or info on this forum?

Headed for the "google" search as we . . . type?
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Old 02-20-2012, 08:23 PM
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Regardless of what type of drill press or the type of bits, get a drill doctor to keep them sharp.
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Old 02-20-2012, 08:48 PM
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Ok, just read about 20 posts on drills.

Crap, what the hell do I need?

I just want to drill through plain steel, with sizes between 1/16" to 3/4" diameter.

My drill press will go down to 50rpm so I will be able to go slow.

High speed, cobalt, TiN, TiAN . . . wtf??

Also a thousand opinions on Drill Dr. vs. hand sharpening. Is it difficult to hand sharpen?
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Old 02-20-2012, 08:54 PM
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Look specifically for High Speed Steel drills. You don't want bits of them, you want the whole damned drill. For most general purpose work, the most common are "jobber length" drills, though I have and use more of the "Screw machine length" drills. Those are the shorter ones and are less likely to snap in drilling shorter-depth holes.

Country of origin can be USA, Japan, Germany anf myriad other industrialized nations, but these day China is the big one. There's good, bad and mediocre drills coming out of there. Look for brand names, including Precision Twist Drill, Cleveland, Titex, Guhring, Norseman, Union, Michigan Drill, Ohio Drill, and Butterfield to name a few.

If you can, start with a set of fractional HSS jobber length in a Huot steel case. There are fractional (by 64ths inch), Letter size and Wire size drills. Huot make cases for all three sets or any one size range.

Do avoid the cheapest Made-In-China sets. They aren't worth the cardboard box they shipped in. As for sharpening them, the best thing is to learn to grind them by hand. I tried a Drill Doctor once and know I can grind one by hand better. I now have a Black Diamond #2B, but that's a tool that probably cost more than twice your drill press. (I paid $375 for the grinder, $229 for the 17" Enco drill press.)

Good luck.

Edit: I see you've just added. High Speed Steel Cobalt (HSS-Co) are usually tougher, stronger drills with thicker webs and often with 135º tips. Most HSS drills are 118º and those are fine for most work. Above 1/2" you'll probably want what is known as "Sliver & Deming" style HSS drills. Those are simply 1/2" and up drills that have 1/2" shanks. TiN coating is Titanium Nitride. It's not really worth the added expense these days because it is often coated onto drills that aren't worth sharpening in the first place. Buy top quality HSS and it will out-perform any TiN, TiAlN or TiCN coated garbage.

Last edited by PixMan; 02-20-2012 at 09:02 PM.
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Old 02-20-2012, 08:54 PM
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To start, IMO, you should get a GOOD set of HSS drills. Enco and others offer them, they are not cheap, but they will last. The last set I bought was Hertel (?) brand and was about $90, for 1/16" though 1/2" by 1/64".
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Old 02-20-2012, 09:58 PM
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I must have looked in the wrong place. I checked one link I found, here in a drill thread, and the set of jobber length drills I looked at was almost $500.

There are lots of options and I apparently know not what I am looking for.

There were drop down box choices that I had no clue what it meant.

The only choices I knew what I was picking was "jobber", 1/64th graduations, and drill index range. What option I chose that took the price to $500 is beyond me.
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Old 02-20-2012, 10:26 PM
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I don't know where you were looking, but here's a truly fine, high-quality set of Precision Twist Drill brand drills for a lot less than that:

http://kbctools.com/usa/Navigation/N...m?PDFPage=0002

Notice the 115-piece set of Made In USA no-name-brand for $159. I'd take that chance, or if feeling rich, go for the PTD set at $333.23
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Old 02-21-2012, 02:02 AM
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I have to agree with both of Pixman's posts especially his first two regarding manufactures & drill point angles.
Also, getting a drill point angle gage and learning to grind by hand is excellent advice.
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Old 02-21-2012, 07:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amigo View Post
I have to agree with both of Pixman's posts especially his first two regarding manufactures & drill point angles.
Also, getting a drill point angle gage and learning to grind by hand is excellent advice.
I sharpened my drills by hand for years....and still do. It is tough to do on bits under 1/4 now as the eyes are fading
And thats where the little drill doctor shines for me.
This SP-29 drill set is a good starter, I have them.
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Old 02-21-2012, 08:39 PM
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I'll add another vote for a Drill Dr. I used to grind my drills by hand. Yah, I could grind well enough so that my drills worked, but my old eyes ain't what they used to be. Using the Dr, all my drills are consistently sharper than I could get by hand. Using a sharp drill, and watching a nice curl come off of each flute is kinda neat. Sharpening a bit takes only a min (and that includes taking the Dr out of the carrying case). My model will sharpen up to and including 3/4" drills. It's a good investment, in my humble opinion.

As far as a source of drills is concerned, I've bought a lot at flea markets and yard sales. Last summer I bought a large coffee can full of them for 50 cents. Sharpened them up with the Dr, and have been using them ever since. I bought an empty drill index (sizes up to 1/2"), and was able to fill about 3/4 of the slots in the index with the drills.

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