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  #31  
Old 09-11-2022, 06:54 PM
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In this situation, grout is your friend. The length of the base plates is a bit questionable as they will not be very stiff, but if the racking is taken care of with stays or cables, it may not be a problem. For 5/8" anchors, a 3/4" hole and anchor bolts set with epoxy closer in in addition to the anchors you have would make the base plates less limber. A diamond core drill will cut thru any rebar in the wall. You will still have rebar in the courses below the depth of the anchors.

Your call.
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  #32  
Old 09-11-2022, 08:03 PM
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What if you just use your own existing anchor at 32” apart with a long steel plate. Probably 1/2”.

Set it on a bed of grout that you squish down with anchor bolt nuts. This will give you a steel plate that you can mount the post to at a later date. If you have field welding power available.

If no welding in field, then you can weld threaded rods on the plate where you want to be able to anchor the future steel post and plate.

Only reason I am suggesting this, is to be able to let the grout set up without the full weight of the post and plates squishing it all out. Or you could maybe welt some 1/2”- 3/4” stand-off pieces so you would end up with at least 1/2-3/4” inches of grout layer to spread the post load evenly on existing block wall.

If you wanted to go extra Mile and have the post already welded to the base plate you could drill and thread bolt holes for leveling bolts in each corner of the plate to allow you to adjust the post to plumb, as is squishing the grout out under its weight. Hard part with this is having the post the right height to match what you need.

In the past, there was times that the contractor wanted the posts plates buried under poured concrete floor on footing pads. But we had no benchmarks until they poured the floor for the height of the finish post to hold the steel beams. We would make up the base plates with a four foot steel tube post, beveled on the top for welding on the top part of post that we would measure with a transit after floor was done with walls, and had something to measure to.

Our outside engineering firm had no problem with weld seams in middle of a post as long as we have beveled for a full penetration weld.


If I remember correctly, you are building this building several hours away from your home shop, so you are trying to prefab stuff as you can. Please correct me if I have you confused with someone else. This info might help others make suggestions too.


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  #33  
Old 09-12-2022, 06:05 AM
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Rebar bit's ain't expensive. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Bosch-3-...2124/301456813

I get that you have the anchor bolts in place and it'd be nice to be able to take advantage, but sometimes when plans change it's better to cut your losses and re-engineer rather than go to great lengths to work with what's there.
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  #34  
Old 09-12-2022, 06:28 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arizonian View Post
In this situation, grout is your friend. The length of the base plates is a bit questionable as they will not be very stiff, but if the racking is taken care of with stays or cables, it may not be a problem. For 5/8" anchors, a 3/4" hole and anchor bolts set with epoxy closer in in addition to the anchors you have would make the base plates less limber. A diamond core drill will cut thru any rebar in the wall. You will still have rebar in the courses below the depth of the anchors.

Your call.
Another enlightening post here.

I was envisioning the use of a fluted twist drill bucking and jamming in the hole as it encounters a bar. I can see now a core drill will greatly smoothen the process. The next step is to confirm that a core drill of the correct diameter is available and able to drill to a suitable depth for the anchor I intend to use.

I can see the benefit of using grout. I would very much like to use it. However replacing it with wood interferes my ability to attach siding. I believe I read about an epoxy based non-shrink grout, perhaps I can tap screws into it.
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  #35  
Old 09-12-2022, 07:12 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
What if you just use your own existing anchor at 32” apart with a long steel plate. Probably 1/2”.

Set it on a bed of grout that you squish down with anchor bolt nuts. This will give you a steel plate that you can mount the post to at a later date. If you have field welding power available.

If no welding in field, then you can weld threaded rods on the plate where you want to be able to anchor the future steel post and plate.

Only reason I am suggesting this, is to be able to let the grout set up without the full weight of the post and plates squishing it all out. Or you could maybe welt some 1/2”- 3/4” stand-off pieces so you would end up with at least 1/2-3/4” inches of grout layer to spread the post load evenly on existing block wall.


If I remember correctly, you are building this building several hours away from your home shop, so you are trying to prefab stuff as you can. Please correct me if I have you confused with someone else. This info might help others make suggestions too.


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This is basically what I had in mind but using two plates of 3/4” plywood instead of grout. My idea was to spread about 1/4” layer of epoxy On the block before putting the wood down. This I thought would be sufficient in filling any voids.

I have scale drawings of the entire building which includes the location Of every joint and hole. The build site is in a rural area of Ohio 300 miles away from my shop. Measuring, cutting and drilling in the field must be kept to a minimum.

I’m certain that a combination of ideas that has been expressed here in this thread will result in a plan of action. This is a one man show. I am the designer, fabricator, erector and funder of this enormous project. I can use any help I can get. This has been very helpful, thank you all.
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Last edited by threepiece; 09-12-2022 at 07:18 AM.
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  #36  
Old 09-12-2022, 09:17 AM
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Why does the wood line have to be continuous at the block level. Where you end up putting the steel plate, can you attach a piece of wood to the steel post that sits down to the steel plate. Then you will just have to remember to put the screws a bit higher at this point in order to hit the wood.


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  #37  
Old 09-12-2022, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by threepiece View Post
Another enlightening post here.

I was envisioning the use of a fluted twist drill bucking and jamming in the hole as it encounters a bar. I can see now a core drill will greatly smoothen the process. The next step is to confirm that a core drill of the correct diameter is available and able to drill to a suitable depth for the anchor I intend to use.

I can see the benefit of using grout. I would very much like to use it. However replacing it with wood interferes my ability to attach siding. I believe I read about an epoxy based non-shrink grout, perhaps I can tap screws into it.
Check with the epoxy anchor supplier. I believe the hole required is 1/8" larger than the anchor.

A galvanized cap plate or sill angle on top the pony wall shot down between the columns with sealant underneath would be a better way to side the walls. Run the siding 1-1/2 or 2" past (below) the sill junction. You can trim (cope) the sill angle so you have coverage across the columns and base plates. You can also add a galvanized trim angle to cover the bottom of the corrugations if you are using steel sheet siding.
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Last edited by arizonian; 09-12-2022 at 12:04 PM.
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  #38  
Old 09-12-2022, 12:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by threepiece View Post
... However replacing it with wood interferes my ability to attach siding. I believe I read about an epoxy based non-shrink grout, perhaps I can tap screws into it.
This is another reason I suggested using a new plate w/new anchors of the appropriate size. Using a plate 10" long (parallel to the length of the wall) there is no reason you can't skip 12" between screws on your starter strip or whatever you are intending to fasten to the ledger board.
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  #39  
Old 09-16-2022, 11:03 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Originally Posted by JBFab View Post
This is another reason I suggested using a new plate w/new anchors of the appropriate size. Using a plate 10" long (parallel to the length of the wall) there is no reason you can't skip 12" between screws on your starter strip or whatever you are intending to fasten to the ledger board.
Yes, that would work but I can’t get comfortable with a 10” long plate. I would at least like to cover an entire 16” block with a steel plate. I am leaning for a bit longer so I can cover an adjacent block by 2”. This would require a plate 18” long. Perhaps my lack of experience and knowledge is forcing me to be overly cautious, perhaps to the point of foolishness.

This block wall will be supporting quit a bit of load, both live and dead. Engineering it was beyond my ability so I have deferred to empirical data from the interned, load charts from a structural steel design book and wits I have acquired over the last fortyfive years.
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  #40  
Old 09-16-2022, 11:21 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arizonian View Post
Check with the epoxy anchor supplier. I believe the hole required is 1/8" larger than the anchor.

A galvanized cap plate or sill angle on top the pony wall shot down between the columns with sealant underneath would be a better way to side the walls. Run the siding 1-1/2 or 2" past (below) the sill junction. You can trim (cope) the sill angle so you have coverage across the columns and base plates. You can also add a galvanized trim angle to cover the bottom of the corrugations if you are using steel sheet siding.
Im not quite with you here. Would it be too much trouble to sketch a section view for me.

I am still uncertain about the siding. The cost of materials now has me considering many different possibilities. I am seriously considering galvanized 16ga. sheet metal. I already have two rolls of this, enough to side two buildings this size.

This roll is 36” wide and over 1000 feet long.
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