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  #21  
Old 01-05-2019, 04:47 AM
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clive clive is offline
 
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I rivetted it but I think if I make some bigger ones I will use bolts. I just used scrap and have another one nearly done but need some more 1/8 for one of the legs.
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  #22  
Old 01-05-2019, 07:28 AM
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MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
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I rivetted it but I think if I make some bigger ones I will use bolts. I just used scrap and have another one nearly done but need some more 1/8 for one of the legs.
Clive..... One of the many I don't know what ill do with them estate sale items I bought, Was five thousand S.S. 6mm. socket head cap screws.

And after watching some of the Kant twist clamp videos, they might be the perfect item to use...

Of course the clamp size will have to prolly be in the 6" up range in order to use them, But, I have plenty to use up.

But being I don't have enough skill at this time to cut my own threads I'll have to go with some all thread instead.
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  #23  
Old 01-05-2019, 10:16 AM
Lew Hartswick Lew Hartswick is online now
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Took a while to get round to it but here it is, thanks Lew
You have to work a bit on the riveting but otherwise Good one. :-)
...lew...
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  #24  
Old 01-05-2019, 07:30 PM
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You have to work a bit on the riveting but otherwise Good one. :-)
...lew...
Lew, I had intended to make a rivetting tool but in the end just whacked it with a hammer, did the same thing just not as neat.
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  #25  
Old 01-05-2019, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
Clive..... One of the many I don't know what ill do with them estate sale items I bought, Was five thousand S.S. 6mm. socket head cap screws.

And after watching some of the Kant twist clamp videos, they might be the perfect item to use...

Of course the clamp size will have to prolly be in the 6" up range in order to use them, But, I have plenty to use up.

But being I don't have enough skill at this time to cut my own threads I'll have to go with some all thread instead.
I cut the threads but if I had any all thread laying about would have used that.
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  #26  
Old 01-05-2019, 10:04 PM
Lew Hartswick Lew Hartswick is online now
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Lew, I had intended to make a rivetting tool but in the end just whacked it with a hammer, did the same thing just not as neat.
I think there was pictures of the "two ball bearing " technique of rolling the hole in the ends of the spacers??

...lew...
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  #27  
Old 01-06-2019, 01:27 AM
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I just bought a few aircraft riveting tools about a month guy had a couple of five gallon buckets of bucking bars and other aircraft sheet metal tools
a couple of the riveting bars look to be hand made

I did some pop rivet work on some sheet metal with some steel rivets last week and didn't like the way the rivets protruded the back side so I took my air riveting hammer and a rivet bar and went to it and surprisingly they rounded off nicely...

So it is nice to be able to use the riveting tools
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  #28  
Old 01-06-2019, 01:39 AM
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I cut the threads but if I had any all thread laying about would have used that.
Clive.... I'll prolly go with the all thread for now but I want to learn how to cut my own threads on the lathe eventually but I am slow learning with this stuff.
You did a nice job on the K/Twist clamps

When I have more time on my hands I want to mess around in the shop
making some my self but also mess around in making some other types of clamps... just because I want to see if I can.... also just because one style of clamp doesn't always work in some applications where clamping is needed.... and I am pretty sick of some of my cheap china clamps that bend with the slightest of real pressure but those have been the got for when I'm in a bind and need that extra clamp as I try not to use them if I don't have to
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  #29  
Old 01-06-2019, 11:18 AM
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Lu47Dan Lu47Dan is offline
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60° threading is not hard to learn but takes practice to get it right. Each lathe is different, I threaded a 2" shaft for a cider press out of SS bar stock, it was a bastard to thread and made one hell of a mess, a couple of years ago. No extra stock and Acme threads. By the time I was done, I had learned never let the customer supply the SS for the job, but it worked. Not very fun for the first few passes. But I learned allot in the process.
Good thing it was a T&M job. So I priced in the new threading tool and the Acme threading inserts for it. Now I just need to get the 60° threading inserts for it. The original brass shaft lasted 60 years but he wanted SS, he paid for that choice very dearly.
Good luck learning, expect to scrap your first few attempts, use new nuts for test fitting the threads
The nut should screw on with hand pressure only, with very little play in the threads. Use light passes until you learn what your lathe likes. Also use known material for your first threading test bars. It is better to spend a little money on new material than spend hours trying to thread a piece of scrap you picked up somewhere.
Learn to grind your own tooling, it in the long run will save you money.
HF tool bits are fine for roughing, but get some HSS toolbits and a South Bend book on Lathes, IIRC it has a section on grinding HSS tooling.
Dan.
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  #30  
Old 01-06-2019, 11:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lu47Dan View Post
60° threading is not hard to learn but takes practice to get it right. Each lathe is different, I threaded a 2" shaft for a cider press out of SS bar stock, it was a bastard to thread and made one hell of a mess, a couple of years ago. No extra stock and Acme threads. By the time I was done, I had learned never let the customer supply the SS for the job, but it worked. Not very fun for the first few passes. But I learned allot in the process.
Good thing it was a T&M job. So I priced in the new threading tool and the Acme threading inserts for it. Now I just need to get the 60° threading inserts for it. The original brass shaft lasted 60 years but he wanted SS, he paid for that choice very dearly.
Good luck learning, expect to scrap your first few attempts, use new nuts for test fitting the threads
The nut should screw on with hand pressure only, with very little play in the threads. Use light passes until you learn what your lathe likes. Also use known material for your first threading test bars. It is better to spend a little money on new material than spend hours trying to thread a piece of scrap you picked up somewhere.
Learn to grind your own tooling, it in the long run will save you money.
HF tool bits are fine for roughing, but get some HSS toolbits and a South Bend book on Lathes, IIRC it has a section on grinding HSS tooling.
Dan.
Have to agree with you on machining the stuff, a stainless nut and shaftcan grab so bad you have to cut the nut to remove it, plus it can walk all over the place when welding.
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