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Old 02-17-2005, 11:24 PM
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Default Stick welding question . . . . . .

I'm not sure if I've ever seen this discussed on this board (and I'm too lazy to search the threads)...............

When stick welding, "arc length" has a lot to do with the weld. A longer arc tends to create more heat (because it uses more voltage, I assume).
A shorter arc tends to "cool" the puddle somewhat, (again, I assume).

* QUESTION * "If you hold a closer arc, should the machine (....or maybe it should read can the machine ) be turned up a little ?

AND...... Am I correct in assuming that you should always try to hold the closest arc possible ?

THANKS !..........Marko
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Old 02-17-2005, 11:50 PM
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Thats a good question.

I always keep a short arc and use a little more heat. It will be interesting to hear what others have to say.
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Old 02-18-2005, 12:07 AM
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Marko
Here is what one of my old books says:

3. Correct arc legnth.
If the arc is too long or voltage too high the metal melts off the electrode in large globules which wobble from side to side as the arc wavers, giving a wide , spattered and irregular bead- with poor fusion between original metal and deposited metal.

If the arc is too short, or voltage too low, there is not enough heat to melt the base metal properly and the electrode quite often sticks to the work, giving a high, uneven bead, having irregular ripples with poor fusion.

- Pocket Welding Guide , Hobart Bros. 1983 p7
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Old 02-18-2005, 12:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DDA52
Marko
Here is what one of my old books says: ........If the arc is too short, or voltage too low, there is not enough heat to melt the base metal properly and the electrode quite often sticks to the work, giving a high, uneven bead, having irregular ripples with poor fusion.........
Ahh, there you have it DDA52......that sentence about "not enough heat"....
That's my question !......."Can (or should) you compensate for a short arc by raising the setting on the machine" ?
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Old 02-18-2005, 12:40 AM
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I guess you could. There is a sweet spot with stick, just like in mig. Once you find the arc legnth for the amperage your running, all is well as long as you can stay there, which can be easier said than done.

If you are welding thin stuff, and the heat is "higher than normal" to compensate for arc legnth, it stands to reason, that some time or times you will hit that "correct for the heat" arc legnth. The results could be ugly.

On thick stuff, if your penetration, & bead's height, leg size, undercut, etc. are where they should be,......... Why not?? That is a lot of variable to control, but the results are what matter, not the journey to the results in most cases.

I know a lot of guys that burn way too hot for my tastes. Their results are spot on, though. I guess they could be compensating for a habitual long arc. Don't know, I never watched them. You know what it's supposed to look like. Keep tinkering until you find your comfort zone to get the desired results. That's what I do.
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Old 02-18-2005, 02:38 AM
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And remember, different electrodes require different arc length.
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Old 02-18-2005, 07:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sberry27
And remember, different electrodes require different arc length.

this is very true.........some like to be burried in the weld pool and some like to have a 1/8* stand off

side note...........i gotta laugh that the POCKET MANUAL has to do with RODS............freaking sickos !!

dawg
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Old 02-18-2005, 07:15 AM
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OK, I got one for you more experienced weldors; you rookies may not understand this quite yet! Have you ever tried to weld where you can’t hear yourself think? The first time I did this I thought there was something wrong with the welder. I got dispatched to an operating can plant. Within a couple minutes was told to grab the stinger and tack a bracket overhead. You know, one of those where you can hardly reach, and you’re standing on your tippy toes! If not, try it sometime. Screw a set of earplugs in real deep, and try to weld something!
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Old 02-18-2005, 08:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pile Buck
OK, I got one for you more experienced weldors; you rookies may not understand this quite yet! Have you ever tried to weld where you can’t hear yourself think? The first time I did this I thought there was something wrong with the welder. I got dispatched to an operating can plant. Within a couple minutes was told to grab the stinger and tack a bracket overhead. You know, one of those where you can hardly reach, and you’re standing on your tippy toes! If not, try it sometime. Screw a set of earplugs in real deep, and try to weld something!
Oh yes, I know what you are saying. I worked in a sawmill for 7 years. Making a good weld requires hearing, seeing and feeling. Put me in a very noisy enviroment and put a patch on one eye and I can't make a bead that looks as good as chicken sh!t .
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Old 02-18-2005, 08:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickman
Oh yes, I know what you are saying. I worked in a sawmill for 7 years. Making a good weld requires hearing, seeing and feeling. Put me in a very noisy enviroment and put a patch on one eye and I can't make a bead that looks as good as chicken sh!t .
SHESSSSSSSSSSSH! Glad to hear that, I thought I was the only idiot that had to hear a weld to know it was correct! Thanks Stickman for posting that! I haven’t welded steady (Day in and day out) for about 18 years, so I forget about a lot of the little things, until I read about them on these boards!
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