Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Blacksmithing & Forming

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 01-19-2007, 05:59 PM
Scotts's Avatar
Scotts Scotts is online now
Stuff, Just stuff
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 5,171
Default

Yup, I can see wedging it in the hardy hole or blowing it up. But man they are made to beat on, right. I may be mistaken but the broken one in the picture looks like it is broke down the middle. I am just curious in case i ever wind up with an opportunity to get an anvil and take up metal flogging.

Thanks

Scott
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-19-2007, 09:50 PM
buckymccal buckymccal is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: georgia
Posts: 25
Default

could be the bottom hole I have noticed in north west Georgia all the old smith anvils are pegged on the stump I dont understand why cause most are 150lbs or more
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-19-2007, 10:39 PM
midmosandblasting's Avatar
midmosandblasting midmosandblasting is offline
Blast this!
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Calhoun ,Mo
Posts: 8,033
Default

Try two guys swinging 8 pound sledge as the 3rd guy holds the iron in tongs. They do move around.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-19-2007, 11:46 PM
Dr Dean's Avatar
Dr Dean Dr Dean is offline
no bull it's huge!
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Oakland Ia
Posts: 1,789
Default

Well guys I've got a couple of customers that I swear that they could break an anvil with a rubber mallet. Now for why the horn is missing, my only guess is that I can see remnats of a weld bead right across the top at the break line. As Brian C noted it is cast and it has very little rebound but still very useable. Jr I'd like to know more about the vice mounting that you mentioned.
I'm still on the lookout for a better anvil but you can't get much for what I'm willing to spend. It seems that around here people are paying $3-4 per pound for junk.
__________________
The person who said "no guts no glory" is probably dead.
There is no such thing as too much ammo.....the real problem is a target deficency.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-19-2007, 11:59 PM
LW Hiway's Avatar
LW Hiway LW Hiway is offline
Lord of the Minions
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Indian Bayou and Lake Charles, La.
Posts: 21,320
Default

That seems to be the average pricing on used anvils across the land.

Just a note, with enough force in the right place and you can break wind.

Sorry, for that one. I've seen some folks that had nice anvils that just abused and sent them to junk status. Of course, that seems to be why they bought them in the first place.

Good anvils are getting harder and harder to come by for a decent price. Of course, what is considered a decent price when you could really use one and not have it.
__________________
God, if you would grant me one request through Prayer, please help me be the Man my Dog thinks I am. Please.

Quoting "The Hunt". "A man will walk into hell with both eyes and arms wide open. His dog will know better."

I never thought I'd live long enough to become a grumpy old bastard. Here I am, killing it!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 01-20-2007, 12:34 AM
dubby's Avatar
dubby dubby is offline
Director: Apprentice Gatekeeper
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lubbock, TX
Posts: 9,444
Default

So, what's the proper way to treat an anvil? Maybe we need an educational thread on this? I always figured you just hit it, maybe gave it a wipe down with oil occasionally, and made sure not to drop it on any coyotes.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 01-20-2007, 03:34 AM
cutter's Avatar
cutter cutter is offline
Curmudgeon
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Lubbock,Texas
Posts: 33,019
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotts
How do you break an anvil? I just have to hear some options here.

Scott
Loan it to my former son-in-law.
Fortunately, my former brother in law is no longer in the family or he would sell it for scrap.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dubby
So, what's the proper way to treat an anvil?
I hug mine every once in a while and thank it every time I use it.
__________________
cutter
Housekeeping Staff: the Gatekeeper
Director of Policy, Syntax and Grammar (by appointment)

"Dr. Chandran, will I dream?"

Just Keep Walking

"I am not a body, I am free.
For I am still as God created me."

Last edited by cutter; 01-20-2007 at 03:40 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-20-2007, 09:27 AM
Brian C.'s Avatar
Brian C. Brian C. is offline
Director of Security
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Waverly, OH
Posts: 2,856
Default

Proper way to treat an anvil-

#1 Dont beat on cold steel

#2 Dont use as a welding or cutting table

#3 Dont use as a chisel cutting table without a protective saddle

#4 Wipe the face down with a light protective coating like WD-40 when not in use

#5 As mentioned before, dont try to move it improperly and dump it into a concrete floor
__________________
"Getting old aint for sissies"

Admit nothing, deny everything, demand proof

Millermatic 211
Harris oxy/act.
2 propane forges
147 lb. Peter Wright anvil
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-20-2007, 07:46 PM
JL Sargent JL Sargent is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Birmingham, Al
Posts: 7
Default

Anvils, yes they are a great tool. I've been blacksmithing for 10yrs or so and have owned a few Vulcans. They typically are prone to poor metallurgy causing brittle edges, With care though, this problem can be mimized and lots of roses created.

Blacksmith conferences are happening all over America and are a great source for anvils. I now have a 500 lb double horn as my biggest which I traded for at the Alabama Forge Councils conference many years ago.

One thing not mentioned about the care of anvils: Try to never hard strike your anvil in extremely cold weather. Its believed that anvils can break from this.

I consider the best of em to be Arm & Hammer. I had a 396 lber which I regret selling. Second would be Hay Budden and then maybe Trenton along with a whole slew of good ones yet.

Interesting fact: Alot of anvils came to the new world as ballast in the bottom of sailing ships.

Last but not least. Richard Postmans' "Anvils in America" is a must have!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-20-2007, 08:21 PM
Brian C.'s Avatar
Brian C. Brian C. is offline
Director of Security
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Waverly, OH
Posts: 2,856
Default

"Last but not least. Richard Postmans' "Anvils in America" is a must have!"

I agree , kind of a specialized topic, but if you are interested it is a gold mine of information.
__________________
"Getting old aint for sissies"

Admit nothing, deny everything, demand proof

Millermatic 211
Harris oxy/act.
2 propane forges
147 lb. Peter Wright anvil
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.