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Old 08-14-2010, 05:52 AM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Default Straightening cast aluminium

G'day, was recommended this site as being the best place I could get the answer to my question. So here it goes.

I have a aluminium cast spindle/knuckle on a front end that has a gradual bend in it. There is no sign of any other cracking and you would not even know it was bent unless compared to one that wasn't.
As far as my research has shown, suspension parts are usually cast from A356-T6. What I would like to know from someone, could this be slowly straightened? I have read of others straightening cast aluminium by first annealing it using a carbon flame and then heating it until the soot made burns off. Then quenching it in water and then press or using a large vice etc to straighten it. Also read putting it in a kitchen gas oven the highest it will go for 2-4 hours is much better before quenching?
Being mainly a steel fabricator in the past this quenching in water is the opposite you would do before trying to work it but not so with aluminium from reading?
Any thoughts or experience or bad idea to try with limited tools etc?
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Old 08-14-2010, 10:21 AM
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moe1942 moe1942 is offline
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Since it is a critical suspension component I would not try it. Bite the bullet and replace it.
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  #3  
Old 08-14-2010, 12:31 PM
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Harvuskong Harvuskong is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gojeep View Post
G'day, was recommended this site as being the best place I could get the answer to my question. So here it goes.

I have a aluminium cast spindle/knuckle on a front end that has a gradual bend in it. There is no sign of any other cracking and you would not even know it was bent unless compared to one that wasn't.
As far as my research has shown, suspension parts are usually cast from A356-T6.

What I would like to know from someone, could this be slowly straightened?

Any thoughts or experience or bad idea to try with limited tools etc?
I would not try the flame treatment for sure.

The slowly straightened out method would be a much safer method if you can not get a replacement.

I hope that you will decide to try the slow method anyway even if you get a replacement part and record the attempt and post the results and etc here after you have done it.

What does this item attach to?
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http://www.swiftvets.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=24981

http://tosettherecordstraight.com/index.php
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Old 08-14-2010, 12:57 PM
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moe1942 moe1942 is offline
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My advice was based on it being a road driven vehicle. If it turns out to be on a cart or wagon I'd try straightening..
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  #5  
Old 08-15-2010, 03:04 AM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harvuskong View Post
I would not try the flame treatment for sure.

The slowly straightened out method would be a much safer method if you can not get a replacement.

I hope that you will decide to try the slow method anyway even if you get a replacement part and record the attempt and post the results and etc here after you have done it.

What does this item attach to?
The item sits between the upper and lower wishbones on the front of a Grand Cherokee. It also supports the hub for the front wheel.

In the photo below, you can see it on the left as is the huge aluminium piece. The bend I have seems to be an increase of the one already there just where it forms around the tyre sidewall. This is a unbent one that I just grabbed off the net and mine is just more bent than shown so now the tyre is closer.
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  #6  
Old 08-15-2010, 03:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moe1942 View Post
Since it is a critical suspension component I would not try it. Bite the bullet and replace it.
Yup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harvuskong View Post
I hope that you will decide to try the slow method anyway even if you get a replacement part and record the attempt and post the results and etc here after you have done it.
I'd like to know how that turns out too on the replaced part.
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  #7  
Old 08-15-2010, 05:45 AM
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midmosandblasting midmosandblasting is offline
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Welcome to the site Go . Pictures are covered under FAQ . We do not do embedded but do attachments as 60% of us are still on dial up.
Be sure to check out these special sections of our site that you might not be aware of:

1. Product/Equipment Review Index

2. Website Equipment, Supplier and OEM Index

3. Project and Equipment Index

4. Tricks and Tips

We look forward to adding your projects, tips or product reviews to these indexes in the near future.
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  #8  
Old 08-15-2010, 09:37 AM
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Harvuskong Harvuskong is offline
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Okay it is a Jeep part.

And it is a critical suspension part too.

New part would be the safest, but it will be spendy, you already knew that of course.

Nothing wrong with attempting to slowly bending it back to proper postition, but the real question is: will it stay straightened or will it bend again?

Another question is how or why did it bend?

Hard hit in rough country, accident damage or weak/defective part?
__________________
Running away is the coward's way out of war.
Appeasement is the coward's way into one.


Barack Hussein Obama is our enemies favorite candidate


In time the right project will find the scrap pile, no need for the scrap pile to go out looking for a project.

http://www.swiftvets.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=24981

http://tosettherecordstraight.com/index.php
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  #9  
Old 08-15-2010, 01:27 PM
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H80N H80N is offline
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Default Toss IT!!!!!

Sounds like a critical part.... if you could straighten it.. would need to be Xrayed and then heat treated...... I know that would probably cost more than a new part..... BUT.... that is my point.... that part was overstressed enough to reach the yield point... and has done it's job... will not be SAFE for use again.... If it were a cosmetic part, I would encourage this... but since it is a critical safety part I say toss it.... how much is yours or one of your loved ones life worth??????
just my 2cents worth..
Heiti
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  #10  
Old 08-15-2010, 05:11 PM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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I will replace the part given the advice here. Even if it from another that is from the wreakers but not from one damaged on the same side. If I do straighten it it will be for setup only and will post the results here if I do.
The bend came about from a guy on a Harley Tee boning the side of the Jeep doing around 100 mph the police estimated. The main damage was at the lower A pillar but the whole front door was caved in and the front wheel shows rubber from the front wheel of the bike. The top of the wheel is now leaning in at 2* of extra camber than stock.
I bought the wreak at the insurance auction to put into a Willy pickup truck project. My web site shows the damage and my project concept.
http://www.go.jeep-xj.info/WillysHotrod1.htm
Think that is better than showing the project photos here as had no idea that there was still people on dailup on such a high percentage any where still and there was forum restrictions about posting so sorry for doing so.
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