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  #11  
Old 08-17-2018, 12:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dubby View Post
Told ya it'd be better than Google. Thanks!
And you were right again.
As a bonus, Jennifer probably didn't flag a notation into your Permanent Record either.
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  #12  
Old 08-17-2018, 09:05 AM
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Thanks Jen,i had no idea either.
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  #13  
Old 08-23-2018, 07:51 PM
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YOu guys are most welcome.. Sorry I didn't get back here sooner..

For some reason notifications from SFT are hit or miss..

here is the finished hammer.. The head weighs 2.75lbs and just over 3lbs with the handle..

The center of it is completely flat for about 3/4" square and then it's rounded out at about 1 degree.. The face is pretty large at 1.750 X 1.625 and for such a large face the flatness takes some getting used to.. It means having to pay attention to how it's swung..

My only changes I'd like to have different are a slightly more radius on the face..

And what I forged with it on the right.. It took about 5 hrs of swinging that hammer..
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  #14  
Old 08-23-2018, 08:31 PM
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Finally, I can see that you did mark it.
That fifth picture is the first one I've seen of that facet of the hammer.
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  #15  
Old 08-23-2018, 08:52 PM
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I took a bunch of photos and I tried to get ones that showed the hammers character.. The top and face just didn't seem to end up in very many posts..

Yesterday I finally filed down the crown (wood wedge and steel wedge) to give it a little bit more finished appearance..
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Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

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DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
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  #16  
Old 08-25-2018, 04:21 AM
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Very nice hammer Jen.

Does the wrought iron have any different properties in use to those of mild steel?
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  #17  
Old 08-25-2018, 08:01 AM
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Very nice hammer Jen.

Does the wrought iron have any different properties in use to those of mild steel?
Yes AJ.. It is a totally different type of material..

Wrought iron won't suffer a fool.. ( IE improper forging techniques)

With that being said.. People today can get away with forging mild steels off side or circular with little care..

Wrought iron comes in cold short and hot short varieties.. Also in different grades of refinement.. SWedish wrought was considered the finest made..

It can splinter or crack if not punched or worked properly..

it was and is still the champion material of the blacksmith..

Wrought iron material was the first process that gave us forge-able irons..

Wrought iron once understood how it works and it's little nuances most would never work modern mild steels again..

A chunk of 3" square wrought iron is pretty easy to work by hand vs a 3" block of mild steel which most would say require a power hammer to work efficiently..

Wrought iron will work about 35% easier though it needs to be worked at a higher temperature..

The largest advantages are multi.. Easy in forging and forge welding.. Won't rust like mild steel, highly electrically conductive and since it has silica in it can be used for high voltage contact switchs.. (this last part i read in a book).
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Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
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  #18  
Old 08-25-2018, 08:17 AM
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Expanding on that a bit, how does it hold up in use--particularly in your application.

Since the head isn't a solid piece of wrought, I am assuming that by itself it doesn't harden as much and can't stand up to the abuse it's going to take over it's lifetime with you. Does it change the harmonics and/or vibration characteristics as well?
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  #19  
Old 08-25-2018, 09:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dubby View Post
Expanding on that a bit, how does it hold up in use--particularly in your application.

Since the head isn't a solid piece of wrought, I am assuming that by itself it doesn't harden as much and can't stand up to the abuse it's going to take over it's lifetime with you. Does it change the harmonics and/or vibration characteristics as well?
Wow, another great question..

Wrought iron won't harden at all via heat treat.. Wrought iron will work harden some..

The steeling of wrought iron (welding on a medium or high carbon steel) is the way it can be used for tooling that must have a hard face or a cutting edge..

A steeled wrought iron piece of equipment will wear differently than a solid steel item..

A wrought iron anvil over a time frame will take a set (sway)as the fibrous and porous structure of the wrought iron compacts.. You see it in anvils as a great example of that compaction of the wrought iron..

A wrought iron hammer with a steeled face will over time take that same sway and it can also crack the face off..

Old steeled hammers were very simple in construction because for the fix one would simply weld back on another face and the hammer would be as good as new..

This hammer on the other hand will be a throw away as it's to fancy forged to allow for a new face to be welded back on without completely ruining the lines of the hammer.. When I say throw away,, I mean the design.. The face can be welded back on but the basic lines of the hammer would have to be reforged..

The peen on this hammer has plenty of steel with a lot of reinforcement.. You can see in the picture just how far back the steel runs into the body of the hammer..

In the face on the other hand you can see it's really only about 5/16-3/8" thick..

The reason for the thinner face is because of contraction when hardening. As steel gets thicker the contraction upon hardening becomes greater.. This creates a wicked amount of pressure at the weld line..

By using a thinner piece of steel this pressure/contraction can be some what controlled..

If using say 1/2" steel, the contraction might be great enough to pull the steel face right off the hammer.. So on a hammer like this with a 1.750x1.625" about 3/8" is about at thick as it can be..

So, as the wrought iron sq inches gets bigger, the steel face can also get thicker..

The peen can be thicker because there is more surface area per weld joint verse the flat face..

As to vibration, rebound etc, etc.. Because wrought iron is porous it's a very unique thing.. The hammer has amazing rebound initially but then it dissipates pretty rapidly..

It also feels different in the fact that is seems to kind of be like a shot filled hammer in that when striking hot metal is sinks in, but on colder metal there is more bounce..

I'll try to expand on this more later..
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Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
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  #20  
Old 08-26-2018, 09:29 AM
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Somehow that's kind of what I'd pieced together in my mind--and what would make it a good tool. With so many commercial hammer designs available, each one seems to find a niche way to market itself and get into your tool basket. Just picking one off the shelf (because your kids ran off with the old one) is complicated because you really don't know how it's going to react. The different handles and cuts and materials make a huge difference, at least to me. Some folks I'm sure just pick them up and bash them around.

Decades ago my Dad had the same problem with an old Sear's finish hammer. I think it was 6 or 8oz, just perfect for his cabinetry work. And of course being Sears brand, he could take it back in whenever he broke the handle off by doing something stupid. It'd also freshen the face back up where it had become worn. He was known to snap a handle just to get a new hammer.

Here I come along as his helper and after our work day was done, I'd stick around and work on little projects myself as he ran off to do whatever he thought needed doing. After many arguments about me losing or abusing his hammer, one Christmas he went and bought a similar set for me--using all the exact pieces that I tended to run off with most. Into the hammer handle he carved a "W" to designate that it was mine and the only one I was allowed to use.

At some point he broke his during a work day and ended up stealing mine. Something about it was different--and we still don't know what it is--but that little hammer is still the most popular in my shop. It looks the same as the rest always did but it just works better. The handle has held up to untold abuses. The face shows very little wear. And it has much better aim and rarely causes frustration. When they were still available, he'd buy a new one every couple years just to see if he could find another that worked like mine. No luck and it always seemed to frustrate him.

He was a lot more OCD that I am, or ever will be. But I can't deny that he's the main reason I ended up a tool hoarder like I am. When you find a little difference in a product that adds value, it's easy to justify bringing it home. There is never enough difference that it necessitates removal of the old one though. Some day you'll always need exactly what one tool offers over another. I think it's pretty damn cool that you can make exactly what you do Jen, and it turns out the way you want it to. And if it doesn't, you will go right back and make it better.
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