Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Blacksmithing & Forming

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 04-17-2018, 10:22 AM
Scratch Scratch is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Hudson WI
Posts: 367
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironman View Post
The spiral is for compound bends or scrolls, I think. For bending scrolls up to 18" wide, I have the instructions saved, because the only way I know other than your spiral is to create a spiral with bolts on a large plate, and use the math to calculate it out.
I'm still trying to wrap my head around needing a spiral layout for making scrolls.... If you have those instructions, I'd love to see them?
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-17-2018, 12:31 PM
LKeithR's Avatar
LKeithR LKeithR is offline
Hey...wait...is there a prize?
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Langley, B.C.
Posts: 4,604
Default

Diacro benders are probably the most versatile bending tool you're going to find. We have a No. 3 which has served us well for years. They publish a manual titled "The Art Of Bending" which has a lot of very useful info. It's specific to their machines but in a lot of cases the "principles" of bending will be the same whatever you're bending with. Worth a look, for sure. Here's a link...

Art-Of-Bending

And instead of drill bits why not use dowel pins instead? They're made of alloy steel, heat-treated and ground .0002" oversize--should be just about a perfect fit in a 1/2" drilled hole. KBC has 1/2" x 2" priced at $1.88 CDN so they're a lot cheaper than drill bits and there'd be no putzing around with cutting or anything. If you want longer they make them up to 4" long...
__________________
Keith

Measure twice and cut once...or...wait, was that the other way around?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-17-2018, 06:22 PM
Scratch Scratch is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Hudson WI
Posts: 367
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Diacro benders are probably the most versatile bending tool you're going to find. We have a No. 3 which has served us well for years. They publish a manual titled "The Art Of Bending" which has a lot of very useful info. It's specific to their machines but in a lot of cases the "principles" of bending will be the same whatever you're bending with. Worth a look, for sure. Here's a link...

Art-Of-Bending

And instead of drill bits why not use dowel pins instead? They're made of alloy steel, heat-treated and ground .0002" oversize--should be just about a perfect fit in a 1/2" drilled hole. KBC has 1/2" x 2" priced at $1.88 CDN so they're a lot cheaper than drill bits and there'd be no putzing around with cutting or anything. If you want longer they make them up to 4" long...
Hadn't thought of dowel pins, thanks for the suggestion... I'll probably go with those instead!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-04-2018, 04:35 PM
allessence's Avatar
allessence allessence is offline
Gadget Girl
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: MA, 01543
Posts: 6,293
Default

those pin benders are very handy..

As to scrolls there is a whole mathematical formula (Ironman knows it) which basically states that a box, withing a box within a box halfed each time is the correct formula..

A scroll for all intensive purposes should look like it's never getting bigger all of a sudden and with no flat spots..

Something about pleasing to the eye.. When I used to make scrolls I never new about the formula.. but I did understand how it is supposed to look to the eye..

Of course there is some variation based on size and such but for any given object bent in a circular way, there is a look that presents as smooth..
__________________
_________________
Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-05-2018, 09:59 AM
USMCPOP's Avatar
USMCPOP USMCPOP is offline
Gold Star Dad
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Richmond, VA area
Posts: 11,802
Default

Jen, do you mean a nautilus scroll?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Nautilus scroll Fibonacci sequence.JPG
Views:	57
Size:	48.6 KB
ID:	145361  
__________________
USMCPOP
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-05-2018, 12:14 PM
Shade Tree Welder's Avatar
Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
Grumpy Bastard
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Kankakee County, IL
Posts: 18,901
Default

Our friend, Mr. Fibonacci,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number
__________________
Shade

"Prepare to defend yourselves."
-- Sergeant Major Basil L. Plumley, Ia Drang Valley
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-05-2018, 01:52 PM
Scratch Scratch is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Hudson WI
Posts: 367
Default

Yeah, I get the whole Fibonacci/Nautilus thing... But I'm still having a hard time figuring out how the spiral layout of holes, (like they are in the first pic in this thread) helps to make a scroll.

I can't find anyone on the web using that layout to make scrolls.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-06-2018, 04:13 AM
JBFab JBFab is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NorthCentral Wisconsin
Posts: 1,120
Default

I made a scroll bender for the Hossfeld knockoff I made many years ago. I'll see if I still have the CAD file.

I used the golden ratio to lay mine out (which is essentially the same as the Fibonacci sequence shown above). After doing the layout, I added some shape to it, and cut the 2 pieces out of 1" plate with a torch. I hinged the two pieces with a #80H? chain link. I don't usually end up using the second piece.

Depending on what time I get home from Madtown, I'll add some pictures tonight.

Sent from my [device_name] using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
__________________
I believe the appropriate metaphor here involves a river of excrement and a Native American water vessel without any means of propulsion.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.