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  #1  
Old 03-21-2019, 06:56 PM
diyjoe diyjoe is offline
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Default Help selecting a welder

I'm looking to weld some sub-frame connectors on to my car's uni-body front & rear sub-frames, to strengthen it, and was wondering if anyone can recommend an affordable (most affordable if possible) welder for a complete noob (never touched a welder before), that can get the job done. Planning to get plenty of practice before doing this project.

Also what is the recommended electrode size for this application?

Here are the connectors I want to weld on:
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/u...a/instructions

Here's a video showing what I'll need to do:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9n1Yc8cgly8
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  #2  
Old 03-22-2019, 01:50 AM
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LKeithR LKeithR is offline
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If you've never welded before the last thing you want to do is start welding on a car chassis. DIY is nice but this is one time when you need some competent help...
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Old 03-22-2019, 02:14 AM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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Welcome to the site.

This project is not for beginners.
Arc welding takes a lot more practice and experience then you think best to get with a teacher for this type of project, when it comes to safety I suggest you find someone that specializes with welding trailer hitches and discuss having him do the welding providing he also has a car lift that will allow loading the car as per instructions.

welding on flat surfaces is one experience then overhead is another skill.


BTW heat does transfer so if you are not careful it its possible to set the insulation and carpet on fire inside while you are under the car, seen it done.
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Old 03-22-2019, 06:39 AM
bunkclimber bunkclimber is offline
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Default select a welding machine

try a rental 130amp MIG welding machine first. Your local rental company(and most welding suppliers) will probably have one for rent. This will let you get your feet wet and understand what you need power-wise as well..for most auto body work .025 solid wire is the usual size used, if you plan on heavier work then move up to .030 or .035 if your machine can handle it. I'd stay away from flux-core (gasless)process machines for anything other than exhaust work.FWIW
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  #5  
Old 03-22-2019, 01:22 PM
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MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diyjoe View Post
I'm looking to weld some sub-frame connectors on to my car's uni-body front & rear sub-frames, to strengthen it, and was wondering if anyone can recommend an affordable (most affordable if possible) welder for a complete noob (never touched a welder before), that can get the job done. Planning to get plenty of practice before doing this project.

Also what is the recommended electrode size for this application?

Here are the connectors I want to weld on:
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/u...a/instructions

Here's a video showing what I'll need to do:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9n1Yc8cgly8
I agree with the rest!
This is not a job for beginners. especially when it comes to welding up on unibody chassis or any other one for that matter... Sorry.

But, I will say It can be done, and you could possibly do it.

I'd go with no less than a decent 140 amp non-flux core for this job...I would use MIG using CO2 or 75/25 mix.

And In your present situation, I would not just start welding on the car I would suggest you get some appropriate metal of the same gauge as the unibody
And practice, practice, practice... until you feel comfortable with your welding and then post some pics here of your welds and get some opinions and suggestions from some of the folks here... who are honest good guys.
and will let you know what they think... "If you might could" Or "Should Not Proceed" with trying to tackle this on your own...

I've done a good many of unibody repairs and modifications over the years and I am not trying to be mean Or discourage you in learning how to but
More concerned for your safety as I am sure others who have posted he are too...

So if you want to "Learn" About, The, What to do's and The, What Not to do's. Plus a lot of ideas, tips, and tricks. you're in the right place for it...
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Last edited by MetalWolf; 03-22-2019 at 01:43 PM.
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  #6  
Old 03-22-2019, 01:56 PM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Some sound advise in all of these responses. One other point is the heat affect zone.

Unitized automobile bodies often have pieces that are made from high strength steel. This steel is sensitive to excessive heat and can be easily damaged by it. Beginners usually are slow with their welds and the heat accumulated by a slow weld can greatly compromise the integrity of the structure. Welding speed is important when welding on unitized car bodies.
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  #7  
Old 03-23-2019, 07:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by threepiece View Post
Some sound advise in all of these responses. One other point is the heat affect zone.

Unitized automobile bodies often have pieces that are made from high strength steel. This steel is sensitive to excessive heat and can be easily damaged by it. Beginners usually are slow with their welds and the heat accumulated by a slow weld can greatly compromise the integrity of the structure. Welding speed is important when welding on unitized car bodies.
Some of them are also held together are structural points with only adhesives. If you beef it up in those areas, it's likely to melt/burn those out reducing their hold and actually weakening to a failure.

I consider myself an experienced DIY welder, I wouldn't attempt it. I've got a spot on the tailgate of my Bronco that I've welded 3 times now and it comes back worse every time. I wouldn't want that happening at speed on something important.
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  #8  
Old 03-23-2019, 10:49 AM
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I got my popcorn, I hope he posts some pictures...
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  #9  
Old 03-23-2019, 11:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
I got my popcorn, I hope he posts some pictures...
Down here, We just grab a sack of tater chips an sit back on da porch
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Last edited by MetalWolf; 03-23-2019 at 12:01 PM.
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  #10  
Old 03-23-2019, 04:29 PM
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midmosandblasting midmosandblasting is offline
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Being green ,unless you have someone to guide you ,take a class at a local junior college to learn basics . Time well spent. It will also help you determine the needs. Personally I would get a C.A.R.T. certified to do it .
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