Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Machining

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-01-2007, 11:14 AM
digr's Avatar
digr digr is offline
The Real Deal
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Duluth MN
Posts: 7,958
Default Bushing removal

This trick is well known I am sure but for those that don't here it is, Today I had to replace the bushings in my drive motor on my plow. Most any bushing in a blind hole can be removed by packing the bushing with grease then pounding a shaft with a sliding fit into the bushing forcing the bushing out. Most of the time you can find a bolt or something the right size but in this case I had to turn one on the lathe. Wood doweling will also work. The pics were taken after the grease was cleaned off.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1.JPG
Views:	725
Size:	82.3 KB
ID:	25322   Click image for larger version

Name:	2.JPG
Views:	681
Size:	84.8 KB
ID:	25323  
__________________
Drawing by Smartdraw

Last edited by digr; 12-01-2007 at 11:27 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-01-2007, 12:51 PM
loopyhomefabricator loopyhomefabricator is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Royal Four Towns, Scotland
Posts: 48
Default

I'll have to remember that one...
I usually strip out things like salvageable bushes/bearings etc. before I toss something into the scrap.
Another method (which is only really suited to extracting scrap bushes from blind holes) is to find a taper tap that just nicely bites into the bush (you don't need, or particularly want full thread depth), grip it's drive square in the bench vise and gently screw the bush onto it. The tap will jack the bush out as soon as its nose bottoms out in the hole.
Particularly useful for the brass bush in the rear cover of a Lucas dynamo, which is an awkward little sod to get at otherwise.
Cheers, Loopy.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-01-2007, 12:59 PM
Cavalry's Avatar
Cavalry Cavalry is offline
Below Wholesale
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Evil Empire State
Posts: 9,018
Default

I was taught this trick many years ago to remove pilot bushings on crankshafts. Another practical example of its use.
__________________
Director of Cryptography-Upstate NY Division
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-01-2007, 01:11 PM
cutter's Avatar
cutter cutter is offline
Curmudgeon
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Lubbock,Texas
Posts: 32,719
Default

Added to Tricks & Tips. Thanks, digr.
__________________
cutter
Housekeeping Staff: the Gatekeeper
Director of Policy, Syntax and Grammar (by appointment)

"Dr. Chandran, will I dream?"

Just Keep Walking

"Passionate hatred can give meaning and purpose to an empty life. Thus people haunted by the purposelessness of their lives try to find a new content not only by dedicating themselves to a holy cause but also by nursing a fanatical grievance. A mass movement offers them unlimited opportunities for both."
Eric Hoffer The True Believer 1951
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-01-2007, 02:19 PM
moe1942's Avatar
moe1942 moe1942 is offline
Voice of Experience
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Alexandria, Louisiana
Posts: 10,929
Default

I don't like the mess so I use a tap...
__________________
Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you... John Steinbeck

"If we ever forget that we're one nation under God, then we will
be a nation gone under". ~Ronald Reagan

We should have picked our own cotton...

I love my women hot and my beer ice cold..
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-01-2007, 02:43 PM
digr's Avatar
digr digr is offline
The Real Deal
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Duluth MN
Posts: 7,958
Default

Yup Yup I like the tap idea! You learn something new everyday. In this case tho I was robing Peter to pay Paul.
__________________
Drawing by Smartdraw
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-01-2007, 03:35 PM
MXtras MXtras is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Virginia
Posts: 342
Default

I will tap them with threads and then use a bolt to push them or pull them out. The grease idea works, but it can take a lot of grease for some assemblies and it can make a mess.

Also, grease, O2 and severe pressure can create a small explosion, right?

Scott
__________________
Haul your bike without straps - www.mxtras.com
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-01-2007, 06:53 PM
AmickRacing AmickRacing is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Rapid City, SD
Posts: 86
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MXtras View Post
Also, grease, O2 and severe pressure can create a small explosion, right?
That just makes it come out faster is all...
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-01-2007, 10:58 PM
Lu47Dan's Avatar
Lu47Dan Lu47Dan is offline
Connoisseur of Old Iron
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: N/W Pa.
Posts: 5,970
Talking

MX , I have known about and used this trick so many times I have lost count , and never have I had an explosion or even close to one . Sure if you did this in a HIGH oxygen environment it might happen but who can afford to produce a High oxygen environment to let YOU test it :evil:
Loopy , will have to file that away in tricks area of my mind , might come in handy someday
__________________
Tools to Men are like Shoes to Women , you can never have too many !!
Used diesel engines are an adventure anyway you look at them !!
Miller XMT-304 Multiprocess
Miller 10-E Wire Feeder
Miller Spectrum 2050 Plasma Cutter
Hobart AC/DC stick welder
Hobart 175 Mig
Craftsman O/A set
Turbo torch and B-tank
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-02-2007, 12:39 AM
mtnkrake's Avatar
mtnkrake mtnkrake is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Crestline, CA
Posts: 174
Default

something I've used to remove pilot bushings is wet toilet paper. Works just like grease but with no mess.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.