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Old 12-06-2018, 12:07 AM
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toprecycler toprecycler is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Petoskey, Michigan
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I usually just rip off a piece of paper from the notebook I am working for. My thinking is I check it with the calipers I tend to use, and usually is about .003. And then I can use what ever drill or cutter I have in the mill holder or chuck at the time. If I am trying to find the center of a round shaft to cut a key way, I will add both the cutter diameter and the size of the round stock together, and then decide by 2, to get the distance I have to move the table after I feel the cutter grab the paper. Depends on how much I tore the paper detriments if I add a an extra .001 or two to make up for the paper thickness. I guess if you use cigarettes papers, you need to sneak up more carefully in order it to leave a mark on the work. The .003 paper gives me a little cushion for moving too quickly.

And by using the paper saves time from switching out the edge finder and putting the cutter back in, too.

If you have a lot of runout in your spindle, you could check both sides of the work, to detrimine the true center of the shaft. The drill chuck that I put in the main mill at work has about .007 runout. I think it was crashed a time or two, so I don’t trust that one too much anymore.

Most of the work I do, I have tolerance of +- ,002 anyways, or more as I watch the other guys work.


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