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Shade Tree Welder 01-22-2022 02:50 PM

CAD software.
 
This question if for those who use CAD software in their home shops. Not your
day job as it pertains to your job, but if you use it for you home projects then I
would include you.

If you 'vote' other please post what software you use.

toprecycler 01-22-2022 07:09 PM

I use TurboCad.

I started with Turbocad 3, that I bought cheap on ebay back around 2003 ish?
I wanted to learn how to use a cad system to help layout handrails and other projects at old job. Our office lady/ bookkeeper had a program that she would use to help get us started, but I wanted more info/ planning. So I set out to learn a program on my own. I never really got the hang of it, but I didnt really stick with it, nor did I have anyone to teach me. So I gave up for a while.

Couple years later, I decided to try again with Turbocad 6, again bought on ebay for cheap, since it was a year or two old, with newer versions out already.

I found it easier, and then managed to start doing more drawings, and the boss actually asked me to do some then. I took a into class at local college, that used autocad. I didn't really like autocad software, but only because I was used to the Turbocad format. But I really took the class to help my drawing skills. I did learn a few tricks, that helped me advance my skils.

When I started at the Hydraulic shop, my new boss learned of my cad drawing, and expressed interest in maybe pursueing having drawings done for certain jobs. He was doing drawings by hand, as needed for jobs.

He bought a new laptop and current version of Turbocad for both him and I to use, but I continued to use my own laptop. He did buy me my own updated software for my laptop, so I have done a couple drawings for work, but mostly to help me as I make parts. I will do a drawing of parts, for jobs that we see more than once, or make changes too, and to make it easier the next time we get cylinder in with broken/ missing parts, in order to remake it back to original. At least, if I do a cad drawing, chances are good that I will be able to make out the dimensions/ writing a year later, vs my hand drawn picture in a notebook.

So I probably use the software more for my side jobs than for work. But I'm still happy that my boss did buy it for me.

I did try google sketchup a couple years ago, but did not keep using it enough to learn it.

I remember a fellow SFT'r make the following comment when a thread asked what was the Best Cad program out there. His answer... "The one you know how to use."

LKeithR 01-22-2022 10:48 PM

You missed a really good one as far as I'm concerned. DeltaCad. I've used it for years and think it works just great. It's not 3D but For a home shop I don't see that being an issue. It's all I've used for our business for at least 15 years. You can export files in AutoCad format or you can create DXF files which are pretty universal. It's cheap, too...$49.95 US for an online download...

dubby 01-23-2022 12:32 PM

Other: Rhino3D

I picked this stuff up when we were drawing up fishing lures/molds. It was sorta pricey back then, but we were able to buy the student/educational model and I've used it since then without any issues. I'd like to upgrade it and wouldn't hesitate to pay full price now, I've just not had any real justification to do so. If the right project came up and I could work it into the cost I'd do it in a heartbeat.

It's relatively simple, has plugins for everything, and works well at drawing up more fluid or organic features. It's one of the top ones used for modeling boats and ships, as well as jewelry and small parts. Very powerful and doesn't take a whole lot of processing power.

It'll handle opening and converting all the other CAD file formats, and outputting the same from it's native .3DM file format.

GWIZ 01-24-2022 05:16 AM

Still using TurboCad 15.

JH35 01-24-2022 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder (Post 779493)
This question if for those who use CAD software in their home shops. Not your
day job as it pertains to your job, but if you use it for you home projects then I
would include you.

If you 'vote' other please post what software you use.

Apologies as I voted before I read your post. I use Solidworks at my day job.:D

Lew Hartswick 01-24-2022 09:16 AM

:-) I don't use any "steenking CAD" . Wouldn't know what to use it for. :-)
...lew...

JBFab 01-24-2022 10:14 AM

I don't use any of the listed software in my day job - it's a ridiculously expensive niche software.

That said I use AutoCAD both to supplement my day job and for home projects. I've played with fusion 360, but I'm far from good at it. Alternatives to AutoCAD that I use are ProgeCAD and DraftSight. Both use similar commands and can read/write dxf/dwg files and are likely a bit cheaper that AutoCAD. Everything I do at work is 3D modeling, for home projects, I simply don't have a need. I do everything in 2D at home.

Ironman 01-24-2022 10:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JBFab (Post 779552)
I for home projects, I simply don't have a need. I do everything in 2D at home.

Same here, I use PAD,(pen assisted design) and transfer to PlasmaCam. I get perfect dimensions and a system that I can easily use and then print it out or cut it out.

Norm W 01-24-2022 05:41 PM

I've used "CAD", Cardboard Aided Design and Amish Cad, pencil and paper. Where I usually have to work, I doubt a computer would survive. Even if I could find a red current bush to plug it into. :D


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