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OldRedFord 03-11-2019 04:44 PM

Wet weather and concrete
 
How wet is too wet to pour concrete? For what seems like six months now it rains every 5 days or so and the ground isn't really drying out. If it doesn't rain for three weeks or two weeks think I'll be able to pour?

milomilo 03-11-2019 05:21 PM

It is only rain after the concrete is in place, then you have to cover it for 2-3 days or until the rain stops. Humidity is a good thing for concrete. Slows down the evaporation so the concrete will be stronger. Visible ground water should be gone before you place the concrete.

slip knot 03-11-2019 05:46 PM

Around here they will pour as long as theres no standing water in the forms and the trucks don't get stuck onsite. its been so wet around here that the concrete pumpers are even being used for home foundations. That was unheard of until now.

greywynd 03-11-2019 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slip knot (Post 732518)
Around here they will pour as long as theres no standing water in the forms and the trucks don't get stuck onsite. its been so wet around here that the concrete pumpers are even being used for home foundations. That was unheard of until now.



Where I was in Onterrible that was common practice. Many of the bigger form companies have their own pumpers, and the subdivisions are so tight that pumping concrete is just how it’s done.

Form footings, pump in the concrete. Form basement walls, pump concrete. Once the forms are stripped, usually a stone slinger is used to place clear stone around the footing weeping tile, and under the basement floor. Often the concrete companies own the slingers as well. On bigger developments I’ve seen the slingers and concrete pumpers stay on site all day, day after day.

Even basement floors will get the pumpers brought in, and the hose put in through window and stairway openings to minimize labour.


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Ironman 03-11-2019 07:26 PM

Tim, concrete hardens under water as well. When you mix water and cement yopu have an initial setting time, when it is fluid. Then it starts the process of hardening. The hardening process is a crystal growth off of a particle of aggregate. If you can look under a microscope at concrete that has started to set and someone threw in a bit of water and mixed it up again, you would see thousands of broken off crystals of calcium carbonate. That is why they say do not remix conc, as there is limited material in the mix to grow crystals, and this requires water to do so.
In three months 90% of the hardening is completed and the final hardening is complete by the thirteenth year.

Just don't get the truck stuck before it has unloaded.

OldRedFord 03-11-2019 08:14 PM

Interesting. I thought pouring over mushy muddy clay would be bad.

toprecycler 03-11-2019 09:36 PM

The concrete will harden up, but if it is too wet, you might not be able to finish the surface like you want. If you want it smooth, your concrete finishers might want it a little more dry. But if it is always raining, you might need to just get the footings done, and get the building put up and do the floor after you get the roof up to keep the rain off long enough for finishing.


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slip knot 03-11-2019 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by greywynd (Post 732527)
Where I was in Onterrible that was common practice. Many of the bigger form companies have their own pumpers, and the subdivisions are so tight that pumping concrete is just how it’s done.

Form footings, pump in the concrete. Form basement walls, pump concrete. Once the forms are stripped, usually a stone slinger is used to place clear stone around the footing weeping tile, and under the basement floor. Often the concrete companies own the slingers as well. On bigger developments I’ve seen the slingers and concrete pumpers stay on site all day, day after day.

Even basement floors will get the pumpers brought in, and the hose put in through window and stairway openings to minimize labour.


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Here everything is slab on grade with maybe 2ft deep footing. No frost line here:D
The illegals and chutes are cheaper than pumpers but pumpers are cheaper than heavy recovery bills. Nobody wants a stuck concrete truck.

LKeithR 03-11-2019 09:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by greywynd (Post 732527)
...Where I was in Onterrible that was common practice. Many of the bigger form companies have their own pumpers, and the subdivisions are so tight that pumping concrete is just how it’s done...

Yeah, nobody hand bombs concrete around here--it's all been pumped for years. I can't remember the last time I saw a construction site that didn't pump the concrete...

arizonian 03-11-2019 11:50 PM

I gotta throw this out there...

Concrete will set under water, but what is bearing it's weight? If it's mud (soil, clay, etc.), and the mud dries out, what prevents the mud from shrinking and the slab settling off kilter?

I may be way off base, I am not a concrete guy, but I would not pour any concrete over really wet mud. As has been mentioned, no standing water. I would also dig down if necessary and backfill with what I call AB (aggregate base) and compact.

Check with some local builders, see what they do. Maybe write an email to Scott Wadsworth (Essential Craftsman) asking his opinion. EC has mentioned that he does not want to wait until right before the rainy season starts to get moving on the house he is building.

Go back and read this post from member DDA52, send him a PM, see what he would do.

Do your due diligence to make sure YOUR project comes out as you want it.


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