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migwelder05 08-26-2011 03:25 PM

"Trigger welding"
 
Ive been meaning to ask this for awhile now, At work I was taught to trigger weld when doing vertical up. Now I always thought this was a big no no. This is how everything is welded vertical up at my work, We build big 5th trailer that way also. Keep in mind we weld everything very hot any where from 26 volts up into the 30s with lots of wire and alot of guys spray arc, we also use different gas mix that makes it weld alot hotter.There isnt a welder there under 200 amps. My welder is a 400 amp hobart. Also You only give it a few seconds between pulls to let it freeze and little but not loose all your heat. Any thoughts? It makes a very nice looking weld if you can keep everything even and keep your distances the sames and the edges melt in very nice. Ill gets some pics of some for yall. :)

milomilo 08-26-2011 03:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by migwelder05 (Post 442023)
Ive been meaning to ask this for awhile now, At work I was taught to trigger weld when doing vertical up. Now I always thought this was a big no no. This is how everything is welded vertical up at my work, We build big 5th trailer that way also. Keep in mind we weld everything very hot any where from 26 volts up into the 30s with lots of wire and alot of guys spray arc, we also use different gas mix that makes it weld alot hotter.There isnt a welder there under 200 amps. My welder is a 400 amp hobart. Also You only give it a few seconds between pulls to let it freeze and little but not loose all your heat. Any thoughts? It makes a very nice looking weld if you can keep everything even and keep your distances the sames and the edges melt in very nice. Ill gets some pics of some for yall. :)

Noting really wrong with welding that way, but triggering is mostly used for thin material to keep from burning through. It is not necessary for thicker material. By working the puddle with a steady feed of wire you can also make pretty welds. It just takes a little more skill. It also, in my opinion, makes better weld penetration. I am not knocking what your doing, just offering a different method.

Walker 08-26-2011 04:58 PM

I would thin that if you set your amps appropriately you could perform the same weld without stopping.

lars66 08-26-2011 06:26 PM

trigger welding
 
Done it for years and years with solid wire to control the heat so the weld doesn't start running to the middle. Takes a while to catch onto just when the weld is ready to sag to the middle and time the restart so its not a cold restart, I watch the color of the bead where I paused for a few seconds. Poor mans pulse welding.

LW Hiway 08-26-2011 08:42 PM

Quote:

At work I was taught to trigger weld when doing vertical up.
Everybody has their own limits of what is and what is not ok.

And I say this from the standpoint of having had to always sell welds to the Quality inspections that followed. But, with the machine set correctly for the material at hand, there is no reason for it. (I'm not talking about thin material either)

Even today after all these many years later, each time lay a bead, that evil little devil looking over my shoulder asking me if this weld will pass inspection, UT and Xray.:rolleyes:

Mig, I hope you continue to strive for that which you seek.

Well done.

JBFab 08-26-2011 09:24 PM

I would hope that a trailer manufacturing company has a decent paper trail as far as welding credentials are concerned (But I know better). Anyway I agree with Jeff, there's just no reason for it. If you do have the paperwork read the WPS this method would have to be detailed. Furthermore, since this is in no way prequalified by the AWS a PQR would be required.

rustythe4x4 08-26-2011 10:51 PM

An old pipeline welder showed me that years ago, and Ive been doing it ever since. Crank everything as high as it will go, and trigger to control. They used it primarily (as i understand) because of the lack of remotes! Lazy buggers!

pumpertruck 08-27-2011 11:37 AM

Back when I worked for a defense contractor, welding that way would get your certifications pulled.

When I worked for Germany it would get you fired.

Not saying I haven't done it and not saying it won't put in a good weld but there are better ways.

lars66 08-27-2011 12:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pumpertruck (Post 442182)
Back when I worked for a defense contractor, welding that way would get your certifications pulled.

When I worked for Germany it would get you fired.

Not saying I haven't done it and not saying it won't put in a good weld but there are better ways.

Some of the best looking vertical welding I have seen was on an internal stiffener plate on the type of boom you are familar with, only problem was there was not enough fusion.

aametalmaster 08-27-2011 06:24 PM

I just passed 2 US Coast Guard 3/4" thick bend tests vert up with .045 gas flux core doing it that way. 45 guys went in and only 21 passed...Bob


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