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-   -   Another machine coming home (https://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53349)

GWIZ 11-10-2021 01:55 AM

That motorized spin fixture will be very hard to replace.

OldRedFord 11-26-2021 09:49 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by greywynd (Post 776470)
As memtioned, it’s a tool and cutter grinder. Making a cutter from scratch on one is doable, but a lengthy process, there are specialty machines out there for that.

Resharpening is where they shine, if: 1.) you have all the parts and pieces required
2.) you know what you’re doing, and really understand cutting tool geometry.

This is one of those specialty machines. Made for making taps and end mills. Not so much on sharpening horizontal mill cutters or grinding lathe tool bits.

I've got a Cincinatti # 2 cutter grinder that's sitting in the shop my lathes came out of. Just waiting for me to pay for it and come get it.

In addition to the radial drill im also bringing back a SIP 3K jig bore machine.

Shade Tree Welder 11-26-2021 10:09 PM

Tim did you win a lottery?

LKeithR 11-27-2021 02:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by greywynd (Post 776470)
As memtioned, it’s a tool and cutter grinder. Making a cutter from scratch on one is doable, but a lengthy process, there are specialty machines out there for that.

Resharpening is where they shine, if: 1.) you have all the parts and pieces required
2.) you know what you’re doing, and really understand cutting tool geometry.

The last place I worked that was setup for it was the diecasting shop, even with likely 30 machinists (manual and cnc) they phased it out, was more cost efficient to buy new at that time. As prices are steeply increasing, that may change.

There are resharpening services out there too, many you can ship stuff to and they ship back when it’s done. They also can often modify existing tools for a specific use.

Sharpening tools is one thing, making your own is another thing entirely. This is 2021 and HSS is pretty much obsolete except when it comes to endmills. And believe me, the metallurgy that goes into modern endmills is far advanced beyond that of any basic tool steel that you can buy over the counter.

Buying new and sharpening is fine but trying to make your own; forget it. Sure it might be fun to tinker with making tools but every hour you waste doing that is shop time that you can't use to make chips and money.

I'm 75 so I guess that makes me old school but I've certainly learned that the old ways aren't always the best. When I first started I ground all my own HSS tooling ( and hated every minute of it) but when carbide inserts started to be available more readily and at reasonable prices I couldn't get rid of my HSS stuff fast enough...

OldRedFord 11-27-2021 04:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder (Post 777207)
Tim did you win a lottery?

No wide, kids, or girlfriend to spend money on.

I won't say what I paid for the SIP, but I will say it's less then scrap value.

randydupree 11-27-2021 08:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OldRedFord (Post 777216)
No wide, kids, or girlfriend to spend money on.

I won't say what I paid for the SIP, but I will say it's less then scrap value.

And worth what you paid for it.

mccutter 11-27-2021 12:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OldRedFord (Post 777216)
I won't say what I paid for the SIP, but I will say it's less then scrap value.

Judging from what the other sage members here have said, I would leave it on the trailer and drive directly to the scrap yard with it. ;)

Ironman 11-27-2021 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LKeithR (Post 777210)
I'm 75 so I guess that makes me old school but I've certainly learned that the old ways aren't always the best. When I first started I ground all my own HSS tooling ( and hated every minute of it) but when carbide inserts started to be available more readily and at reasonable prices I couldn't get rid of my HSS stuff fast enough...

Yep, if the "old ways" were the best, we would have kept them. Progress is always moving forward to less cost for better quality.

Shade Tree Welder 11-27-2021 07:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LKeithR (Post 777210)
Sharpening tools is one thing, making your own is another thing entirely.

This is 2021 and HSS is pretty much obsolete except when it comes to end mills.

I'm 75...

Agree completely on point one.

End mills and drills... :rolleyes: And yes HSS is greatly deminished from where it once
was. But Stellite and High carbon steel once ruled cutting tools and I bet most
people have never heard of Stellite.

Hell I didn't know you were that old, I should be nicer...

Quote:

Originally Posted by OldRedFord (Post 777216)
No wife, kids, or girlfriend to spend money on.

Kids are really expensive... I might be able to retire now that they are gone...

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ironman (Post 777227)
Yep, if the "old ways" were the best, we would have kept them. Progress is always moving forward to less cost for better quality.

Somethings should be remembered and taught.

Grinding your own tools while not a productive way to spend time today,
did teach a lot of machinists how cutting tools worked. Just like stick welding
very little production welding is SMAW anymore, yes it still has its place but
most pipelining has gone to dual shield.

I still start out new weldors with stick to learn the basics. MIG is too easy and
they don't learn puddle manipulation, like they do with stick and Tig.

greywynd 11-28-2021 03:36 AM

If a machinist is ‘field machining’ with limited resources, they better know how to sharpen HSS and carbide with a bench grinder, because that is often all that there is.

When you’re working on a jobsite, with whatever tools and equipment that fit in a pickup truck, you make do with what is available.


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