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Ironman 02-07-2019 08:59 AM

Proper setup of a mobile home
 
Wondering about some advice in site preparation, etc.
The home will be set up on screw piles spaced 9 ft apart per manufacturers recommendations.
Some people lay 6 mil poly under it, some people put a groundcloth and 4 inches of gravel under it, some do nothing.

I think the best thing to do would be to have dirt contoured so that any water would shed to the outside and not collect under it, and call it good.

milomilo 02-07-2019 10:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ironman (Post 730227)
Wondering about some advice in site preparation, etc.
The home will be set up on screw piles spaced 9 ft apart per manufacturers recommendations.
Some people lay 6 mil poly under it, some people put a groundcloth and 4 inches of gravel under it, some do nothing.

I think the best thing to do would be to have dirt contoured so that any water would shed to the outside and not collect under it, and call it good.

What type of skirting are you gonna use to keep the waterlines from freezing? I think the contouring so no water collects is the right thing to do. Expect you will use heat tapes on the water line?

midmosandblasting 02-07-2019 11:57 AM

I always like the idea of a concrete pad under it all . It gives storage ,ability to roll anywhere under it to work on the water lines . No we did not on the one that has turned into storage as I am not a land lord .

MetalWolf 02-07-2019 01:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by midmosandblasting (Post 730239)
I always like the idea of a concrete pad under it all . It gives storage ,ability to roll anywhere under it to work on the water lines . No we did not on the one that has turned into storage as I am not a land lord .

+1 far better to put it on a slab...
working under one not on a slab well just plain sucks! and for some odd reason when their on a slab the critters that would be nuisances don't seem to like it very much, I gues it does not seem as inviting to them...

LKeithR 02-07-2019 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by milomilo (Post 730236)
What type of skirting are you gonna use to keep the waterlines from freezing? I think the contouring so no water collects is the right thing to do. Expect you will use heat tapes on the water line?

Quote:

Originally Posted by midmosandblasting (Post 730239)
I always like the idea of a concrete pad under it all . It gives storage ,ability to roll anywhere under it to work on the water lines . No we did not on the one that has turned into storage as I am not a land lord .

Having lived in a (highly modified) mobile home for the last 45 years I have a pretty good idea of what works and what doesn't. I would highly recommend a concrete pad; it makes it much easier to work under the unit. Also make absolutely sure that the pad is level and is elevated enough that there is no way that water can run into the crawl space. When we put our home in we were pressed for time--we moved in the night our first son was born :eek:-- so we didn't put in a concrete pad and we didn't have the ground as level as it could have been. When it rains really hard water sometimes runs underneath and that can make it really miserable to work down there. Not such a big deal 25 or 30 years ago but now that I'm in my "golden" years :eek: the thought of crawling under to do some work is enough to keep me putting it off.

Also, having the pad makes it real easy to skirt the trailer. If the pad is level you can frame up simple walls of 2 x 4 (or even 2 x 6 if you want) and use regular fibreglas insulation. I'm pretty sure that an insulated 2 x 6 skirting would mean that you wouldn't need to worry about heat tapes or any other protection for your water pipes. You're aging out like me and you want to make things as bullet-proof as possible so you don't ever have to crawl under the thing and work on it. Peace of mind and comfort matter a lot to us old farts.

I know you're big on screw-piles but if you have a good pad under the trailer I can't see why you'd need them.

Another thing to consider is how high off the pad you want the trailer to be. In the event that you do have to crawl under there you want the height of the trailer to be comfortable for you. Too low means you're always cramped and fighting to do things while too high means you can't comfortably reach up to work on something. The ground under our trailer slopes so at one end it's too high and the other it's too low. :eek: There is a section in the middle that's just right though.:D

I'm sure I'll think of other things but these are just a few quick thoughts. Sounds like you've decided to go ahead with the mobile home idea like we talked about the other night...

Ironman 02-07-2019 02:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by milomilo (Post 730236)
What type of skirting are you gonna use to keep the waterlines from freezing? I think the contouring so no water collects is the right thing to do. Expect you will use heat tapes on the water line?

In any mobile constructed in Canada the last 30 years at least, they are completely insulated and meet CSA standards for energy loss. This standard is at +22 degrees inside and -40C outside the heat loss is not to exceed 30btu/hr per sq ft.
Pipes don't freeze, but where they enter the building, in any type of construction they have to be insulated with a thermostat controlled heat tape. I lived in a trailer in Yellowknife and they did not use heat tapes on the pipes coming in, just insulation, but in fairness, the city water is in two lines which are constantly circulating, and the lines to the houses also have a circ pump to circulate back to the city lines.
If you have to skirt to keep pipes from freezing, your building has failed. Skirting keeps critters and bugs out and looks good.

You could not rent the forms for the cost of installed screw piles, and the heating of the ground before the pour, unless you do it all in summer, is a fun thing. I cannot think of a single home in our country or anywhere I have lived that is on a slab. Better to waste the money on conc piles below frost line. Saw one guy who did that last week. He augered 8" deep holes, and filled the holes with concrete and then used blocking on top of the piles. Then you would have to cast in anchors for wind anchoring, very doable.
He was a farmer and they let them do what they want, all others have to have an engineered design. When I went to pour my shop slab, the local engineering firm wanted $6000 for the design. I found a way around that.

Screw piles are around $280 each installed, and torque readings and engineered plans are provided for the county.
I used them in my shop, and vowed I would never do that again, because of the cost. I did not realize how badly I was ripped off, and I soon found out how poorly they were installed. No issues for load bearing, just crooked and could not follow a straight line to save his ass. Thankfully he went bankrupt.

Here is an example of an installer doing it right. These are some of 700 trailers he installed in Ft Mac after the fire.

milomilo 02-07-2019 02:28 PM

The screw-piles are good for wind protection. If you do not have a concrete pad I would suggest you have several concrete pilings deep enough to get on solid ground for all the blocking to level it and keep it from sinking.

milomilo 02-07-2019 02:32 PM

Is the mobile going to tie in to your existing septic?

Ironman 02-07-2019 02:43 PM

5 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by LKeithR (Post 730253)

Another thing to consider is how high off the pad you want the trailer to be. In the event that you do have to crawl under there you want the height of the trailer to be comfortable for you. Too low means you're always cramped and fighting to do things while too high means you can't comfortably reach up to work on something. The ground under our trailer slopes so at one end it's too high and the other it's too low. :eek: There is a section in the middle that's just right though.:D

I'm sure I'll think of other things but these are just a few quick thoughts. Sounds like you've decided to go ahead with the mobile home idea like we talked about the other night...

Yes, height is important as I can't even crawl under the shack at present, that was before the kitchen started to sink.
Not counting the jacking and re-pouring of a footing, to re-insulate with 2 inches of styrofoam, I have a pretty fair quote of $46,000. I could actually buy a good trailer for that price. In this weather, the furnace runs continuously as this shack leaks an amazing amount of heat, and I am unwilling to spend more on it. As long as I burn coal, I can live with it but I can see the end of that too.
The wiring would cause hair loss if you looked at it, and I think you can put lipstick on a pig, but it is always going to be a pig.

So yeah, we can afford a 20 x 76 mobile...oh shit, I forgot...they don't make mobiles any more, they are called self contained homes now:rolleyes:
I paid 90K for this 2007 one.

The last picture is the important one. It specifies the compliance numbers for a 1520sq ft unit.

Milo, I'll tie into the existing septic tank, and hook up to the second well, the one you used. I am not sure, but I may just bury the house well when I backfill the basement. The 3" casing is just too small for even a modern jet and forget about a submersible.

LKeithR 02-07-2019 03:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ironman (Post 730262)
...Not counting the jacking and re-pouring of a footing, to re-insulate with 2 inches of styrofoam, I have a pretty fair quote of $46,000...

Didn't think it would be that much. If you have good insulation in the skirting do you need to insulate the pad? I realize you're also looking at the reality that you're only going to be there for so long so there's a trade off between how much you put into it and how much use you get out of it. We're sort of facing the same thing now that we have the place sold. We've got to put some work into the trailer to make it more livable and presentable but we can't get too carried away, either--we'll have to find a balance somewhere.

Quote:

...So yeah, we can afford a 20 x 76 mobile...oh shit, I forgot...they don't make mobiles any more, they are called self contained homes now...
Around here they refer to them as modular homes...


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