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-   -   Making a chuck key out of some unknown (https://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50352)

MetalWolf 12-29-2018 10:56 PM

Making a chuck key out of some unknown
 
1 Attachment(s)
Was walking in the sand in the back kicked up a piece of metal while I was thinking about what I was going to use out of the scrap pile...

Oh plan is to make a double ended chuck key to use on both chucks 1 key

not sure where this came from as it was in the far back of my property
buffed off the rust with the wire brush and it appears to be some sort of tool or pin looks like one end was hammered on but other looks like a punch or handle insert..... anyway I chucked it up in the lathe and took a few light dust off passes but decided to take off about two thousandths and found it to be really hard stuff this is where it is at after about 15 or so passes mostly because I'm using a cheap carbide tool from HF and they chip and brake easy so just going easy with it chips aren't chips its more like fine steel wool instead of chips

but I am wondering when I am ready to machine the flats in it at the end
if I should use the surface grinder or if I should use the mill
I'm pretty much out of O/A so I cant do any "annealing" to it... not sure if spelled rite....

so because I'm not sure of what alloy it is which would be best to do the flats with
Attachment 148642

4gsr 12-29-2018 11:10 PM

If that was some sort of pin from an implement or such, could be carburized or just down right hard in the 50's RC. Long stringy fine brillo pad chips plus not being able to take a heavy cut is an indication it is hard. Your HF tool bit is pretty tough taking cuts like that on something hard.

Carbide end or fly cutter should cut flats on it. If not, SG will. After all of that work is done and the first time you take a good bite on tightening on a piece of material and it snaps off, then it is too hard to use for a chuck wrench.

All of my home made chuck wrenches are made from 1144 or stressproof. Even 1018 cold roll will work, may wear out quicker. A piece of 4140/42 HT would be ideal but not that easy to find for most of us.

The last commercially made chuck wrenches I bought were made of 4140/42 HT, they were not rock hard or even in the 45-55 HRC range.

Ken

MetalWolf 12-29-2018 11:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 4gsr (Post 727359)
If that was some sort of pin from an implement or such, could be carburized or just down right hard in the 50's RC. Long stringy fine brillo pad chips plus not being able to take a heavy cut is an indication it is hard. Your HF tool bit is pretty tough taking cuts like that on something hard.

Carbide end or fly cutter should cut flats on it. If not, SG will. After all of that work is done and the first time you take a good bite on tightening on a piece of material and it snaps off, then it is too hard to use for a chuck wrench.

All of my home made chuck wrenches are made from 1144 or stressproof. Even 1018 cold roll will work, may wear out quicker. A piece of 4140/42 HT would be ideal but not that easy to find for most of us.

The last commercially made chuck wrenches I bought were made of 4140/42 HT, they were not rock hard or even in the 45-55 HRC range.

Ken

Could I take some of the hardness out of it as I do fear it will snap....
Or should I just start over with something else like cold roll and save this piece for something more suitable..?

Ironman 12-30-2018 12:20 AM

Some of the nicest machining steel out there is hardened pins. etc. and then tossed into the woodstove overnight before machining

cutter 12-30-2018 12:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MetalWolf (Post 727357)
I'm pretty much out of O/A so I cant do any "annealing" to it... not sure if spelled rite....

Well, since you mentioned it, "annealing" is right, "rite" is wrong and the "brake" you use for everything is only correct when you're speaking of stopping trains, planes & automobiles, or in metal forming.

I have no idea how sticks & stones might "brake" your bones but that sig line drives me nuts. :)

MetalWolf 12-30-2018 12:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cutter (Post 727373)
Well, since you mentioned it, "annealing" is right, "rite" is wrong and the "brake" you use for everything is only correct when you're speaking of stopping trains, planes & automobiles, or in metal forming.

I have no idea how sticks & stones might "brake" your bones but that sig line drives me nuts. :)

Well all I know is I'm not perfect....an wont pretend to be... But I try... So I fixed the tag line so you don't go totally crazy on my account ;)

MetalWolf 12-30-2018 01:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ironman (Post 727372)
Some of the nicest machining steel out there is hardened pins. etc. and then tossed into the woodstove overnight before machining

I'm looking at a older gas forge but not sure if I want to go that rout just yet
found one for 400 and another one that is smaller but more expensive that is an electric one for 900 but also tossing around the idea of building one
just for hardening as I don't plan on doing any blacksmithing as that is more work than I care to do not to mention I can at times be a bit accident prone and would prolly burn my self if it were a regular basis use

But I guess for the time being I could fire the bbq pit just for this piece have to check to see if we are under a burn ban first...
but that is something I did not think of was using a wood fire Thanks Gerry....

Lu47Dan 12-30-2018 08:21 AM

Woodstove works well to anneal a hardened piece of steel. I have some two foot long pieces of round stock that were harder than the hubs of hell that I tossed in the woodstove overnight, that now turn very well.
A burn barrel can also work if fed a steady diet of hardwood, to get a bed of coals before adding the material to be annealed. Then keep feeding wood in to get them red hot.
I did a 2-1/2" X 18" broken pin out of a excavators boom once to make a part for an OPP. Turned well, after annealing.
Dan.

4gsr 12-30-2018 10:30 AM

Yeah, BBQ pit with a bed of mesquite burning make a good hot fire to anneal that piece of material. Let it cool down in the bed of coals until it virtually cool. Pull out too soon, it could re-harden,, depending on the original material grade used.

digger doug 12-30-2018 02:13 PM

I would cut it in half, and make 2 separate wrenches.

I like to place my left hand over the center of the wrench and spin
it.

Having a double ended one would be much clunky-er.


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