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-   -   Anvil shooting video (https://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=49513)

toprecycler 05-16-2018 10:51 PM

Anvil shooting video
 
https://youtu.be/Pb1SpUh_yKg

Seems like anvil abuse. [emoji4]
Hope the link works.


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Samcord 05-17-2018 12:04 AM

Link works. I hate the anvil abuse, but dayam, I can’t keep from laughing.

LKeithR 05-17-2018 12:10 AM

The City of New Westminster on the outskirts of Vancouver has held an "Anvil Battery Salute" to the Queen on the 24th of May long weekend (a celebration of Queen Victoria's birthday). The tradition goes back to 1870.

I haven't been for many years but I still remember it as quite a spectacular show. I think they've toned it down some now but the last time I was there they performed a "21 gun salute" by firing off 3 volleys of 7 anvils. Given the vagaries of powder burning fuses the shots were not always well timed but it was still pretty interesting when you had up to 7 anvils in the air at the same time.

From the Hyack Festival website...

"The Hyack Story

​New Westminster has a rich history dating back to 1859 when it was selected as the first capital of the new colony of British Columbia and officially named by Queen Victoria after her favourite part of London.

​The official naming by the Queen gave New Westminster its nickname ‘The Royal City” and recognition for being the first city in Western Canada. Probably for that reason, a custom was begun in early days which has survived right up to the present time …… a 21-gun salute to the Monarch on Victoria Day each year. And therein lies a story.

It seems that New Westminster’s volunteer firemen were a lively lot back in the 1860’s. They called themselves the Hyack Fire Company – “Hyack” being a Chinook word which meant ‘hurry up”. Up until 1870, the Army had fired the yearly salute to the Queen, but their cannon was no longer available, and the salute was about to be abandoned.

The Hyack Fire Company members, many former Royal Engineers came to the rescue. One of the volunteers recalled having seen gun powder being put between two anvils and fired off. Blacksmith and later Mayor Thomas Ovens, one of the original Hyacks, donated two of his anvils and after many bruises and burns, the experimenters succeeded in perfecting a method of producing controlled explosions. That ceremony endured for many years as the Hyack Anvil Battery Salute."

tnmike 05-17-2018 09:08 PM

I've seen this done many times. In fact I saw Tim Ryan do it twice. It's not without risk. As many fun things are.

https://dailyjournalonline.com/news/...cc4c03286.html

terry lingle 05-18-2018 09:33 AM

No word on the condition of the anvil :devil:
It does not sound like the injury was too serious.

Wolfram 05-23-2018 07:21 AM

Looks like a good way to end up with a splitting headache!

Needs more Bullseye. :devil:

Harvuskong 05-23-2018 11:06 PM

During the Morning of Nov. 11, 1918 in Hamilton Texas, a local Blacksmith there wanted to let the town know that the Armistice that ended WWI had arrived. Five o'clock in the morning in Hamilton was the 11th hour on the battlefield.

It has been reported that he and another fellow stayed busy all morning and possibly most of the day shooting the anvils.

The blacksmith repeated the anvil shooting for the following two years at the same time in the morning on Nov 11th.

The local American Legion then took over the Annual Anvil Shoot on every Nov 11 since then. I am not sure if they had to halt the Anvil Shoot during WWII. It is their Annual Fund Raising Event.

This year will be the 100th Anniversary of the Anvil Shoot in Hamilton TX.


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