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USMCPOP
12-12-2017, 09:58 PM
Thought you'd like to see a few old Thai/Hmong hill tribe knives that I've accumulated. In addition, I wanted to see if others could see the pics here.

Cheap knife with blue plumbing pipe sheath was maybe $2. Old pointy knife next to it I got free from my sister-in-law who is a scrap dealer. My old Thai blacksmith friend made me a twin of that as a gift. He made the curved knife next to the rattan sheath, also a gift. The short one next to it is a beautiful Mien (Yao) hill tribe knife with some sort of rosewood handle. Cost me $5. back in 1979.

Edit: I first said Hmong knife, but it's Mien. Both make good stuff.

Walker
12-12-2017, 11:42 PM
I believe those would be hot forged knives, very difficult to forge iron cold, it would have to e silver or copper, which don't make very good knives.

baldy347
12-13-2017, 12:27 AM
What did I miss?

Thanks for the pics,I like the band work!

Wayne

arizonian
12-13-2017, 02:40 AM
What did I miss?

Thanks for the pics,I like the band work!

Wayne

I think he said to stay out of dark alleys at midnight...

baldy347
12-13-2017, 04:15 AM
Anymore I seem to live in the dark...

allessence
12-16-2017, 06:54 PM
Mighty fine work there.. This is the kind of work I strive towards every time I light the forge..

LW Hiway
12-16-2017, 07:13 PM
I believe those would be hot forged knivesUntil that point that you re-read the title of the post and realize that "cool" is spiffy and not cold. lol Nice knives.

Running the river in Vn we would come across all type and shapes of knives and machetes, all of which were home made of sorts. All deadly standing in front of the pointy ends of things. Of course M-14's and M-60's at your back while your looking at the contents of the boat makes all the difference in the world.

USMCPOP, I found some nice sharps down in Ven., South America and Mexico a time or two. But that was in the day when you could carry such things in baggage that was not carry on. Hell, I can remember not having to have carry on baggage etc searched. Good old days. lol

USMCPOP
12-16-2017, 08:46 PM
Mighty fine work there.. This is the kind of work I strive towards every time I light the forge..

The old guy had zero power tools. Not even a hand-cranked grinder. He would clean up a rough-forged blank with a homemade draw knife made from an old, worn out file. He did use a file to get the final edge before hardening/tempering. After that, it was sharpen it on a locally-sourced rock. They have some that are like Washita or Arkansas stones, but used with water.

Riverr1
12-27-2017, 06:22 AM
I believe those would be hot forged knives, very difficult to forge iron cold, it would have to e silver or copper, which don't make very good knives.

Actually cold forging of iron and steel is common. Example: the heads of golf clubs. Hot forging changes the crystallization of the metal and cold forging does not. Although it's called cold forging after the metal has been struck a couple of times there is no way you could hold it in your hand. It's not red hot but it's hot.

USMCPOP
12-27-2017, 10:47 AM
Here's a good video showing a Thai blacksmith performing some of his magic. Pabong Village near Chiang Dao in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.


https://youtu.be/GM0Mlt4YgxM

allessence
12-30-2017, 12:58 PM
He's doing some differential hardening and tempering during the same heat. I love seeing him harden in water..

In this case he's very experienced as there is very little shade to even see what temperature the steel is even at..

Sent from my SM-N910C using ShopFloorTalk mobile app (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=94314)

cutter
12-30-2017, 02:11 PM
Here's a good video showing a Thai blacksmith performing some of his magic.
Fascinating. :) I enjoyed seeing him shape the point by using another machete to pare off a sliver of hot steel.

USMCPOP
12-30-2017, 10:35 PM
Fascinating. :) I enjoyed seeing him shape the point by using another machete to pare off a sliver of hot steel.

My old blacksmith would clean up a knife by forging/quenching/re-tempering and sharpening for less than $1. He would even upset the cut-off end so you didn't lose a hair off the end and kept the edge profile.

Same guy who taught his dogs to carry out trash to the dump pile with a mumbled command and a nod of his head. He showed me how to put a chicken to sleep.

milomilo
12-30-2017, 11:23 PM
Here's a good video showing a Thai blacksmith performing some of his magic. Pabong Village near Chiang Dao in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.


https://youtu.be/GM0Mlt4YgxM

Thanks to a very generous member here I can attest to the usefulness of these knives. Very handy when doing light tree branch trimming. One whack is all it takes.

baldy347
12-31-2017, 10:20 AM
Here's a good video showing a Thai blacksmith performing some of his magic. Pabong Village near Chiang Dao in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.


https://youtu.be/GM0Mlt4YgxM

Finally had a chance to watch the video; many thanks for the link!


wayne

USMCPOP
01-17-2018, 01:24 PM
Thai guy attacking some zombie sugar cane with one of the curved knives. Thai woman has a bigger knife and knows how to use it.

USMCPOP
02-01-2018, 11:48 PM
He's doing some differential hardening and tempering during the same heat. I love seeing him harden in water..

In this case he's very experienced as there is very little shade to even see what temperature the steel is even at..

Sent from my SM-N910C using ShopFloorTalk mobile app (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=94314)

Jen, my blacksmith would quench spine first. He also put on a wee thin wash of some special clay. Maybe it was to prevent decarburization or surface oxidation to see the temper color once quenched. But it was done in a continual manner and the blade didn't get to room temp.

And you are right about the light. I could never see what he was seeing, standing away in the glare. Folks like that don't rely on one sense alone.