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biker55
11-17-2017, 12:10 PM
is it possible to forge during very windy conditions? or are there reasons not to? I don't have space in my garage to do any forging, so I have to do it outdoors. another note. when I decide to make a bettere forge, what's a good size fire pot for a hobbyist. Thanks

weldor2005
11-17-2017, 12:18 PM
If using a coal forge, or forge welding, you have a lot of sparks that will get carried to otherwise intended places which may cause unintentional thermal events.

biker55
11-17-2017, 12:44 PM
thanks for responding so quickly. guess I'll have to wait for a calmer day. just added another question to the original post.

terry lingle
11-17-2017, 12:48 PM
If using a coal forge, or forge welding, you have a lot of sparks that will get carried to otherwise intended places which may cause unintentional thermal events.

I believe that you had one of those:devil:

digger doug
11-17-2017, 01:13 PM
If using a coal forge, or forge welding, you have a lot of sparks that will get carried to otherwise intended places which may cause unintentional thermal events.

Spoken like someone who works for a fire extinguisher company.....:D

Matt Shade
11-17-2017, 01:29 PM
My forge is gas, with venturi burners (no blower) and it doesn't particularly like strong wind. It will run in it but it huffs and puffs and burns sporadically.
If I put a blower on it it would run fine, but would make more scale on the metal. As long as I keep it somewhat out of the wind, like in a garage with the door partially up, it works just fine.

I don't have any experience with coal forges. I am sure there is a sweet spot for depth vs. width if you look around. All in all it depends alot on what you want to make.

weldor2005
11-17-2017, 02:54 PM
I believe that you had one of those:devil:

;) I may have.

toprecycler
11-17-2017, 07:14 PM
I believe that you had one of those:devil:



Haven’t we all?[emoji4] I have had a couple myself.


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=94314)

allessence
12-03-2017, 06:42 PM
Okay.. So ideally for general work a firepot depth of 4.5-6" in depth is ideal..

I prefer a little deeper at the 6" mark or even a little deeper.. The depth depends on how much air you want to throw at it on a regular basis..

A hand crank blower is my preferred as it's just easier vs electric unless you have a rheostat mounted right at the side of the forge with no bending over..


Forge welding can certainly lead to a fire but so can large pieces of scale that come off or a rouge hot cut flying off somewhere..

ideally where I have found the flames come up are 90% of the time on old paper towels,, mouse chaff from nest making or leaves that have gotten blown in from outside and hidden somewhere for a year or more..

In the forge shop at a distance of about 10ft the slag coming off the metal is just about at air temperature.. So it's stuff that is close as in a few feet that will catch easily.. For me old paper towels are the main hazard and usually 5 or 6 fires a year in the trailer as I save them for wiping grease or oil or wax from forged and finished items.. Or for knife making..

a rectangular firepot is preferred.. The last firepot I bought from N.E.B. it is 4" deep with a 8 3/4 X 11 inside at the top.. These are a little shallow for my liking but once the school is open these will serve just fine and they are a very heavy firepot with nearly 1 " thick cast iron sides..

I will be making the elbow out of 316SS weld ells.. This particular firepot has funky sized opening so it is not a true 3" but more like 3.5"..

I'll post pictures once I get the elbow made..