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allessence
10-09-2016, 09:55 AM
Hi, by now most you guys have a pretty good idea of what it is I do and the area forging wise I specialize in..


I have been planning on putting a book out for the last 30 years and way back then it might have been a smashing success as there wasn't much information out there on the subject..

Now there are lots of options.

So, I am looking for ideas on a book structure that you guys would want to have in your collection..

The main theme is " Traditional hardware forging"

It will cover traditional hardware, (thumb latches both Norfolk and Suffolk thru cusp and swivel lift) hinges both strap and H, H-L and butterfly, a section on proportions.. a section on tool making.. and of course Nail making, bolt rivet making..

Ideally I would want it to be a book that gives a beginner a fighting chance but also accomplished blacksmiths knowledge to bring thier work a step further..

So, question.. Format: step by step drawings, then step by step with photographs.. With maybe a secondary DVD or Bluray with exactly the same steps but sold separately? Or included but would incur a pricing increase..

What would you guys like to see in such a book?

Anyhow, all thoughts and comments welcome.. I need more insight and you guys are family so you can say pretty much what ever you'd like.. :D

toprecycler
10-09-2016, 11:36 AM
First thoughts off the top of my head.

1. Start with the basics. Especially if you are gearing towards the beginners. Blacksmithing is an art that you learn as you go. ( at least I think it is :-) ) maybe at heady a short section on the forge, anvil, and basic tools needed.

2. Section and making the tools needed. Tongs, poker, shovel, etc which would help teach the basics.

3. Then you can get deeper into your speciation of hardware, hinges, and other items.

You are right that most anything can be found online today, but there is always room for more quality stuff. I'm not sure how many books could be sold, but at least the books will survive a lot longer than anything electrically saved. Would be good to preserve your info in hard print writing. Maybe you could offer a pdf version of the book too. DVDs are great for seeing the actual process, and can help teach without actually being there. But will you be able to make $ selling the books and DVDs with so much info out there for free? I don't know. But you have a lot of knowledge that should be saved and shared!

Brian

allessence
10-09-2016, 11:53 AM
First thoughts off the top of my head.

1. Start with the basics. Especially if you are gearing towards the beginners. Blacksmithing is an art that you learn as you go. ( at least I think it is :-) ) maybe at heady a short section on the forge, anvil, and basic tools needed.

2. Section and making the tools needed. Tongs, poker, shovel, etc which would help teach the basics.

3. Then you can get deeper into your speciation of hardware, hinges, and other items.

You are right that most anything can be found online today, but there is always room for more quality stuff. I'm not sure how many books could be sold, but at least the books will survive a lot longer than anything electrically saved. Would be good to preserve your info in hard print writing. Maybe you could offer a pdf version of the book too. DVDs are great for seeing the actual process, and can help teach without actually being there. But will you be able to make $ selling the books and DVDs with so much info out there for free? I don't know. But you have a lot of knowledge that should be saved and shared!

Brian


Would you want to start with forge tools? ( hooks, nails, leaves, candle holders come to mind as beginner projects)

There are lots of books for the beginner... And there is so much information on getting started out there ( Do you think it really needs to be covered)..

Ideally the book would start with easy items and work in a progression towards harder projects.. shovels are high up on the list of hard to make well..

Mind you a section both on solid fuel fires and gas forges would be welcome especially with a coal forge..

USMCPOP
10-09-2016, 12:48 PM
Jen,

Whatever you do, one publishing avenue to consider is Amazon. Specifically their Create Space publishing arm. My wife recently published a book of her philosophical ramblings. No cost (she didn't use any additional services). She hasn't had it converted for a Kindle reader, so don't know how that works.

allessence
10-09-2016, 01:05 PM
Jen,

Whatever you do, one publishing avenue to consider is Amazon. Specifically their Create Space publishing arm. My wife recently published a book of her philosophical ramblings. No cost (she didn't use any additional services). She hasn't had it converted for a Kindle reader, so don't know how that works.

Thanks for the info Pops. Any thoughts on the book? Something you would like to see in print?

digr
10-09-2016, 01:21 PM
I like the idea of starting with the basics as toprecycler stated. Maybe have a two book set sold individually or as set, one for a beginner and one for advanced work. Personally if I was going to get started in it I would want one source to use with everything I needed to know in it. Then I would buy the set, if I already had the beginners work figured out then I would just buy the advanced book.

USMCPOP
10-09-2016, 02:03 PM
Jen, I guess I'd do a little research on what books are out there now, even if it meant a trip to the library. The only book(s) I've read on the subject were Alexander Weygers. I did like his style.

But there's style and then there's content. You don't need to rehash all that is out there from the ground up. It's a tough call. Perhaps put yourself in the position of an expert smith specializing in hardware and pretend you just got a new apprentice. (Read "indentured servant".)

I would think that cluing people in on certain moves to manipulate metal in a certain direction for maximum effect would be useful. Efficiency. As you mentioned in another post, you had half-forgotten a way of scarfing for a weld. Or the progression of banging parts from thick to thin, and where to avoid burning pieces up. When to bend or flatten what.

It's a kinda Zen thing sometimes, in my limited experience. You will things into the shape that you want.

For purposes of illustration and ease of photography, don't discount using modeling clay or the like instead of metal. You may have to chill it, but some use it to teach how metal moves when struck.

toprecycler
10-09-2016, 09:05 PM
I guess the reason I said tools like tongs first, was I figure you need those to make the other things too. Would you rather buy them or make them yourself? I guess you can go either way. Some people will start black smithing on a tight budget, and will make what they can vs paying $ for already made tools. I know I am on the frugal side so I would probably make my own tools if I can. I seem to have more time than money.

Brian

milomilo
10-09-2016, 09:26 PM
I too think starting with the basics will draw the beginners. I would suggest:

Cover the proper type of clothing and safety gear
Types of forges
Types of fuel
How to start a forge/How to put out a fire
Show types of tongs for specific uses
What is the proper fire to maintain for forging, heat treating
Show how to select types of steel for specific types of uses
Show how to stretch, taper, fold, weld
Start with easy examples of how to make simple things
End with more complex items

Pictures are good, but videos are much easier for beginners to understand the "how to". I'd offer both since beginners would probably want both and semi experienced people would just want the book.

rmack898
10-10-2016, 07:02 AM
Hi, by now most you guys have a pretty good idea of what it is I do and the area forging wise I specialize in..



The main theme is " Traditional hardware forging"

Jen,

Like you have said, there are many books and videos out there to get a beginner started, why add to that pile.

You have a specialty that is not well covered any place else, so why not take advantage of that void and concentrate your efforts on what you do that others don't.

The heart handle on the poker you made is awesome. I am in the process of building a coal forge, but even though I haven't got my forge built yet, I would buy a book that showed how to make things like your heart handle just to keep me motivated.

RancherBill
10-10-2016, 12:49 PM
This sounds like a great project.

I think I'd write a 3-4 page outline for the book along with a detailed outline for one chapter and then actually write the chapter. Then I could get some input from a publisher, novice and experienced blacksmiths. This book falls into lots of book categories - 'How To', historical, coffee table, interior design etc. For example I have read lots of this category of book and the 'style' of photography is different than you see on the web.

There are lots of great books that nobody reads for a variety of reasons. I'd talk to people to see what sells and what holes there are in the market.

As an aside, I also ask publishers how they do pics. They seem to have a 'pro style' that you don't see all the time on the net where somebody is just clicking away.

Geoffm
10-10-2016, 03:03 PM
Donald Treeter's book is good for unusual hardware and how it is made. Worth a look to see if this is the theme you want.
The basics are well covered elsewhere such as Jack Andrews book "the edge of the anvil" and others. I would cover those quickly then move onto the meat of it on hardware and how it is made.

allessence
10-10-2016, 06:15 PM
This sounds like a great project.

I think I'd write a 3-4 page outline for the book along with a detailed outline for one chapter and then actually write the chapter. Then I could get some input from a publisher, novice and experienced blacksmiths. This book falls into lots of book categories - 'How To', historical, coffee table, interior design etc. For example I have read lots of this category of book and the 'style' of photography is different than you see on the web.

There are lots of great books that nobody reads for a variety of reasons. I'd talk to people to see what sells and what holes there are in the market.

As an aside, I also ask publishers how they do pics. They seem to have a 'pro style' that you don't see all the time on the net where somebody is just clicking away.

Thanks. All good info.. I have to say.. I'm not an entertainer.. I am more of a factual person and very 1, 2, 3.. More of a college text book then a McNealy..



Donald Treeter's book is good for unusual hardware and how it is made. Worth a look to see if this is the theme you want.
The basics are well covered elsewhere such as Jack Andrews book "the edge of the anvil" and others. I would cover those quickly then move onto the meat of it on hardware and how it is made.

Hi Geoffm, Welcome aboard... Thanks for the info.. I'll have to check into these books..

There are so many out there now it is crazy..

SmokinDodge
10-10-2016, 09:56 PM
Jen your probably familiar with the series but the Foxfire books are a staple at my household. They are a series of country/Appalachian life that snap shots the thirties/forties and fifties and tells how they not only survived but made a good life. The first book covered every aspect needed for country life. The follow books expanded on each chapter of the original in depth. I was always interested in the log cabin building and moonshine operations but could care law about candle making and canning.

I always though it was a neat way to handle it. You could do the broad strokes in the first book and then go indepth in each following book. That would allow folks to select the skill or method that they were interested in by purchasing only what they wanted or needed and it keeps from having a 1,000 page book.

How ever you go about it please make sure you let us know where and how we can get a copy. I'll put money down now. ;)

baldy347
10-11-2016, 07:18 AM
I too will but money down now; looking forward to the Book!


wayne

Mooney1el
10-11-2016, 08:09 AM
Jenn - First I want to say that I love reading your threads, they are entertaining and informative. You do have a gift and should be applauded for sharing it with others.

As to the book: I am too old to even contemplate starting into blacksmithing so take what I have to say with that in mind. Personally, were I to get into blacksmithing and were looking for documented help, I would like lots of pictures. Not unlike your threads. However, the pictures should show the steps in the production, not: here is the starting point and here is what the finished product looks like as one sees in many books. You may have to stop in the middle of an operation to show what you are looking at while working. And, you may want to show what a mistake looks like and how to recover if possible. In other words, intentionally make a mistake as a novice might do, then show how it might be corrected...or not.

A thought I have about taking the pictures: Use a GoPro like camera with headgear mount. That way what appears is almost exactly what you are seeing. You could then download the video and extract still "frames" for inclusion in the book.

These videos could then also be used to create downloadable instructional videos, either for sale or accessed through the book purchase. In other words, create a video book along with the printed material.


Richard

allessence
10-11-2016, 09:30 AM
Jenn - First I want to say that I love reading your threads, they are entertaining and informative. You do have a gift and should be applauded for sharing it with others.

As to the book: I am too old to even contemplate starting into blacksmithing so take what I have to say with that in mind. Personally, were I to get into blacksmithing and were looking for documented help, I would like lots of pictures. Not unlike your threads. However, the pictures should show the steps in the production, not: here is the starting point and here is what the finished product looks like as one sees in many books. You may have to stop in the middle of an operation to show what you are looking at while working. And, you may want to show what a mistake looks like and how to recover if possible. In other words, intentionally make a mistake as a novice might do, then show how it might be corrected...or not.

A thought I have about taking the pictures: Use a GoPro like camera with headgear mount. That way what appears is almost exactly what you are seeing. You could then download the video and extract still "frames" for inclusion in the book.

These videos could then also be used to create downloadable instructional videos, either for sale or accessed through the book purchase. In other words, create a video book along with the printed material.


Richard

Nice input.. I use a helmet mounted camera everyday for the Farrier business.. I have been trying to figure out a way to mount the cameras so I can take good visual shots but a cameral mounted on the front of a helmet adds a lot of forwards weight..

((I currently run 2 3D cameras when I am forging, one at the front looking at me and one from the horn side shooting both the anvil and forge..
All this stuff takes so much time..))

I haven't figured out a way to do it that doesn't stress my all ready sore neck (got hit in the head by a 400lbs log that fell about 15ft smacking me right on the very top of the head.. Luckily I was standing straight up so it impacted right in the middle and the force went straight down through my body but my neck didn't like it much have had problems ever since. If I were bent over at all I would have been dead. Was rather impressive to watch as the person watching testified to.)

Adding in excerpts on mistakes is a good point also.

Since you made a great observation with ( you make this and end up with that no steps inbetween) From the threads I have posted on the blacksmithing projects/lessons Have they been lacking enough informations to get to a finished project?

Thanks

allessence
10-11-2016, 09:39 AM
Jen your probably familiar with the series but the Foxfire books are a staple at my household. They are a series of country/Appalachian life that snap shots the thirties/forties and fifties and tells how they not only survived but made a good life. The first book covered every aspect needed for country life. The follow books expanded on each chapter of the original in depth. I was always interested in the log cabin building and moonshine operations but could care law about candle making and canning.

I always though it was a neat way to handle it. You could do the broad strokes in the first book and then go indepth in each following book. That would allow folks to select the skill or method that they were interested in by purchasing only what they wanted or needed and it keeps from having a 1,000 page book.

How ever you go about it please make sure you let us know where and how we can get a copy. I'll put money down now. ;)


I love the foxfire books.. What a treasure trove of information.. Sadly my set disappeared over the years from my Dads house.. time to by a new set I quess..


The idea of a first in series then a branch off to different facets would be a great venue.. My only concern is you have to hook someone before they can see the book has value.. There literally are thousands of beginner books out today and what would set this book apart?

William Nealy made educational and fun to read books about white water kayaking and Mountain biking which were fun to read.. Sadly that's not me..

More of a nuts and bolts person.. How do I present blacksmithing to beginners that would get there attention and purchase the first book?

"How to forge a knife in 3 easy steps????" LOL>>

Nuts and bolts blacksmithing for idoits? (yes I know idiots is spelled wrong)

Beginners blacksmith concepts and execution?

Just spit balling here.. I've got mega respect for all you guys.. So all this information is flawless and very helpful..

Thanks..

jdpflyer
10-11-2016, 11:39 AM
Jenn,

There have been several good suggestions already.

My thought would be a chapter on basic blacksmithing, safety, and minimum tools followed by a detailed chapter on each of the pieces you make. You could also introduce another more advanced tool in each chapter.

Any way you decide to go, put me down for one of the first additions of your book.

Mooney1el
10-11-2016, 03:30 PM
Jenn - I did not mean to imply that your threads are lacking in any way.

"Since you made a great observation with ( you make this and end up with that no steps inbetween) From the threads I have posted on the blacksmithing projects/lessons Have they been lacking enough informations to get to a finished project?"

No, usually not; but I have read other books etc which leave a lot out in the middle. Just encouraging you to keep including the process and not only the product :)

Don't know what helmet cam you use or how it is positioned or mounted. I have used my GoPro with head strap mount for hours without ill effect. I would be happy to let you borrow it for a while to try out if it would help. I don't use it much. You would only have to provide an SD card s I have no spares at the moment. I also have a 'Chesty" which carries the camera on the chest, but I don't think that angle would be good for showing the work.


I am sorry to hear about the accident, I can surly empathize. Several weeks ago I had a bucket fall off the tractor and hit be in the back/shoulder and pinned my leg. The saving grace was that the post I was setting took a lot of the brunt. It still hurts and at almost 70 recovery is slow.


Richard

allessence
10-11-2016, 08:20 PM
Jenn,

There have been several good suggestions already.

My thought would be a chapter on basic blacksmithing, safety, and minimum tools followed by a detailed chapter on each of the pieces you make. You could also introduce another more advanced tool in each chapter.

Any way you decide to go, put me down for one of the first additions of your book.

Do you mean.. Like make a tool then make an item.. Like make a chain hook for the anvil, then make chain?

Jenn - I did not mean to imply that your threads are lacking in any way.

"Since you made a great observation with ( you make this and end up with that no steps inbetween) From the threads I have posted on the blacksmithing projects/lessons Have they been lacking enough informations to get to a finished project?"

No, usually not; but I have read other books etc which leave a lot out in the middle. Just encouraging you to keep including the process and not only the product :)

Don't know what helmet cam you use or how it is positioned or mounted. I have used my GoPro with head strap mount for hours without ill effect. I would be happy to let you borrow it for a while to try out if it would help. I don't use it much. You would only have to provide an SD card s I have no spares at the moment. I also have a 'Chesty" which carries the camera on the chest, but I don't think that angle would be good for showing the work.


I am sorry to hear about the accident, I can surly empathize. Several weeks ago I had a bucket fall off the tractor and hit be in the back/shoulder and pinned my leg. The saving grace was that the post I was setting took a lot of the brunt. It still hurts and at almost 70 recovery is slow.


Richard

No. I just wanted to be sure the timing of the projects were such that someone could follow them..

When I work I have a tendency to work very quickly and as I get more warmed up my speed increases.. I Know exactly what you mean as .. Here and now finished".. With no explanation of how the person got there. Lots of people do that because they have a website subscription which is a pay for use type thing..

I might offer online lessons as well, we'll see..

I appreciate the offer on the GoPro.. I am a drift innovation fan myself.. Much smaller profile.. But thanks just the same..

I did put a new mount on my farrier helmet so the camera was in the front.. The angle was off some but it looks decent, though confusing since it's almost like being on someones shoulders and looking down, especially when I move fast..

I'll might have time tomorrow to edit the video and I'll post it for a private view to the SFT crew..

jdpflyer
10-11-2016, 09:07 PM
Do you mean.. Like make a tool then make an item.. Like make a chain hook for the anvil, then make chain?

Exactly. That way a student could use the basic tools, learn to make more advanced tools, the proper use of the tools, and actually turn out a finished product.

SmokinDodge
10-11-2016, 09:20 PM
Start with an anvil repair book. Once that's out of the way you'll know how you want to do it.

allessence
10-13-2016, 05:15 AM
Start with an anvil repair book. Once that's out of the way you'll know how you want to do it.

:eek:Thats funny.. Do you think it would be a big seller????? While interesting I'm sure it would be way out of most peoples comfort, and equipment zone.. :D

allessence
10-13-2016, 06:27 AM
please do not link or share this video.. This is for SFT peoples to check out and give feed back..

But this was a test run.. I'll have to move everything off the floor. which you can't see from the other cameras..

I do realize some of the footage is off center.. I had to change the angle of the camera..

Also I have to warn.. It is very different looking down from a moving target so to speak..

https://youtu.be/j8bQ7cs5eB8


Be sure to let me know what you guys think..

Mooney1el
10-13-2016, 07:47 AM
Jenn- I cannot tell you how much I like the video...it is great! Need to tweek the camera angle though. I like the way it shows the little things that go unnoticed in instructional photos. Like when you casually reach over and dust off the top of the anvil :) You put things away during the down times while waiting for heating. And I think you throw a burning something out :)

It will come perfect!


On a side note, no one ever taught me how to hold a hammer and I notice that you hold with your thumb in handle direction rather than wrapped around. Is that for more precise hammer control?


Richard

allessence
10-13-2016, 10:37 AM
Jenn- I cannot tell you how much I like the video...it is great! Need to tweek the camera angle though. I like the way it shows the little things that go unnoticed in instructional photos. Like when you casually reach over and dust off the top of the anvil :) You put things away during the down times while waiting for heating. And I think you throw a burning something out :)

It will come perfect!


On a side note, no one ever taught me how to hold a hammer and I notice that you hold with your thumb in handle direction rather than wrapped around. Is that for more precise hammer control?


Richard

LOL.. Yes on the burning something.. It was a paper towel that I used to clean off the solar panel on the awning.. It's funny how it was on the other side of the metal bin and it still caught fire and it was 3 ft from where the hot metal was..

To answer about the hammer.. A hammer is basically a lever.. The head being at the end of the lever and your hand acting as the fulcrum or pivot point on the shaft..

If you re watch the video you will notice when I'm doing fast repetitive lighter strikes is when the thumb moves to the handle.. This limits the amount of pivot the hammer has as it moves up to the top of the stroke before moving back down.. the strikes are quicker and lighter and a little off beat. chink,, a chink achinka.. chink... chink, chink, chink.. Achink..

It makes for a more controlled hit in a shorter duration because you are controlling the leverage better at the pivot point and keeping the head from rolling upwards in the closed fist which would change the timing for the next hit at the anvil.. other thing it does is locks more pressure into your hand and wrist..

As an example take a 12" ruler and hold it in your clenched fist like a hammer.. Now apply a bending back force towards the side of your forearm which faces you with your other hand. Then do the same thing with your thumb on the ruler.. You will find you can control the ruler much better and with less force needed than with a clenched fist only.. :)

when using the hammer in a walloping fashion the hammer is held with the thumb to the side.. The hammers pivoting is controlled at the top of the stroke on it's own since it's basically pivoting from the elbow and the strike is maxed out at the end of the arm extension overhead, this straightens the pivoting in your hand and makes the hammer face in alignment with the arm.. At this point the hammer has time to correct itself before it hits the metal on the anvil again.. Strikes are steady and rhythmic.. Thump, thump, thump..

I filmed the making of the shovel.. Which after the poker I closed the awning down some so there is better color expression as it's not so washed out from the sun..

Thanks for the input and question..

toprecycler
10-13-2016, 06:34 PM
Impressed on how quick you started the fire! Almost quicker than a gas forge.

When you sprinkled water on and around the coals, was that to slow down the burning of those coals? Or did that serve some other purpose?

thanks for sharing the video. The Camara angle was nice. It was almost like what I would see as I would be doing it. The more angles that you can record, the bigger overall picture that you can teach from.

Brian

allessence
10-13-2016, 08:24 PM
Impressed on how quick you started the fire! Almost quicker than a gas forge.

When you sprinkled water on and around the coals, was that to slow down the burning of those coals? Or did that serve some other purpose?

thanks for sharing the video. The Camara angle was nice. It was almost like what I would see as I would be doing it. The more angles that you can record, the bigger overall picture that you can teach from.

Brian


I'm always amazed when someone says the forge takes 10 minutes to start..

1-2 minutes to start and about 5 to get it big enough for a good welding fire..

The water does 4 different things.. the coal on the forge was just put on there so it was completely dry..

So, 1. the green coal gets watered to help the larger pieces and the smaller pieces stick together as they are applied to the side of the fire before they are turned to coke.. (this acts as a shielding of sorts by reflecting the heat and gases back into the center of the fire).

2. the water helps to steam out some of the impurities like sulfur. (so they say)..

3. Any fire that is larger than called for is a waste of fuel.. so the water actually puts out part of the fire if the fire gets out of control (this is not good fire management) shows a lack of understanding..

The reason I used it in that manner was because the fire just being started has both coke and green coal inside the firepot.. This creates large lumps of coke which divert air around the large lumps and creates several hot spots around the firepot instead of concentrated in the center where it belongs.. I basically doused the fires that had peaked up around the newly formed coke.

After I did this you can see where the fire started to take on a more rounded corner retangle vs rounded line on oneside, dead fire, then little heat spots.

4. it can help lower the flame front.. If you watch the video you can see when the forge was first started it was burning with lots of flame.. this is because it has lots of green coal in it( green coal is unburnt coal) The flames are actually the volatile gases burning off as the green coal turns to coke..

Those are the good things about using water..

Ideally one should try to control the fire via air input, banking of the coal as it moves towards the fire and is created into coke.. also being careful of how things are put into and taken out of the forge firepot.. Water is a tool just like all the others..

The bad part is: Water lowers the temperature of the fire.. So each time it is used the temperature of the fire is lowered by several hundred F°.

So ideally water use should be limited to only when needed when the fire gets away from you, or when the coal is dry..

The coal on the forge was very dry as it had been sitting in the trailer for about a week and with the big hunk of coke that formed you could see the fire spreading towards the other side of the firepot..


Coal fire management is not a very well taught subject today.. Most people have no clue on how to really manage a fire properly.. A forging fire, is different than a welding fire.. And then there are actually 4 classifications of fire design,, open, Shallow, hollow, and what I call coke full or closed.. For most small items a shallow fire will serve most. though I don't really use it much unless I'm working really small stuff at the end of a day and need to make 80 nails..

A hollow fire is a fire that has been built fairly large (tall) and then watered green coal is piled on top and packed down tightly with the back of the shovel. (sometimes a small hole is put in the top but usually it just has a small opening where the metal goes in.) Then air is turned on and the whole mass is allowed to cook and turn into coke..

The center will burn out and this creates an open cavern inside.. this is a hollow fire and for most purposes should be avoided.. For welding it can offer some purpose.. But mostly its a waste and should be avoided unless you need it for a delicate welding project where you are trying to achieve the same temperature in both pieces where one is stacked on top of the other with no securing..

An open fire is just about useless and is what I see being done by most these days.. :mad::eek::confused:

A shallow fire: is a fire that is fairly tight with a slightly raised center with coal stacked up around the sides being fed in just a few pieces at a time.. again good for nails and such..

The coke full fire which I prefer for just about everything.. This creates a very large neutral (stoichiometric) atmospere inside the fire.. Or as close as one can get.. this is what is in the video.. Mounded up coke in the center with ample green coal being pushed in from the sides.. this keeps the coke well supplied..

Anyhow. there you have it..

I'll be able to copy, and paste most this info into the book.. LOL.. :D

milomilo
10-13-2016, 09:19 PM
I never realized it took two heats and two applications of flux to weld. By the way I really liked the video regardless of the camera angle. The little things you do while waiting for the heat were very informative.

allessence
10-14-2016, 06:01 AM
I never realized it took two heats and two applications of flux to weld. By the way I really liked the video regardless of the camera angle. The little things you do while waiting for the heat were very informative.

Takes as many heats as needed to finish the weld.. first weld is a tack weld.. second, 3rd, etc etc till the weld is finished..

Ideally if the object/item is made out of steel the fewer heats taken to weld something together the better. if you are not careful in welding steel you can damage the steel as the carbon can burn out and this is known as burnt steel.. Wrought iron not so much of a problem since it contains nearly 0% carbon..

this batch of flux has a great ability to stay fresh (not oxidize so stays fluid) so could probably not reflux for the second welding heat but it's just what I'm used to.. clean and reflux.

AJinNZ
10-29-2016, 02:34 AM
I just got to this thread and watched the video.

Loved the video. The only criticism would be that the work would at times start to disappear off the top of the screen.

For content, if you include what you just posted about coal fire management and the flux you make by heating borax you will already be way ahead of most books out there. I have never seen that info in a book and I have quite a few now.
I don't consider that 'beginner' info, rather very good info that an awful lot of people could benefit from.

I am always looking at woodworking books. The numerous examples that cover stuff right from the start....like identifying tools and their uses, timber choice etc.....I put them back. Once that has been learnt from the many many books, you tube and so on it is just repetition.
My favourites are what a friend called 'technical books' in particular those that cover the old ways of doing/making. Often today the emphasis is on power tool use and setup at the expense of how to actually make.

Your video which included heading a rivet was excellent. I watched and thought 'so that's how you do it.....'
Making hinges, latches and so on is gold to me and not so common in the blacksmithing book world.

When you write that book I will buy it. An included DVD for certain processes would be of great benefit to my thinking, the additional cost wouldn't put me off at all if the book already had me hooked.

JWS
10-29-2016, 06:44 PM
Jen, being a farrier since '77 and now not able to beat on metal due to my arm's situation, I lived vicariously through your video!!:) I think the content of the book has been discussed and well thought out so far. What I have been thinking about is the construction of the book. Maybe like the old stenographer tablets complete with the hole in the middle at the top of each page as well as the covers. Maybe with plastic type pages so it can be carried to the shop, hung on a nail to refer to, and with plastic type pages it can be wiped down clean.

I really like the idea of a chapter on making a tool and then using that tool to make something else in the next chapter. So, chapter one could be introduction, safety and terminology. Chapter 2 would be building a tool, chapter 3 using that tool to build something. Thus, even chapters would be tool building chapters, odd chapters building an item using the previously built tools.

Good luck and envy your enthusiasm and energy.