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allessence
08-24-2012, 09:22 PM
I've been wanting a new farriers apron for awhile (IE one that fits) and well it dawned on me a few weeks ago that maybe since I'm making hoof knives and have a hoof stand in process that maybe I should just go ahead and make one..

Now hold on..


I went to the local shoeing supply and asked if they had any long aprons.. Turns out they had a Gibbins in stock a long no less.

It has velcro which I hate to have on an apron that gets used a real lot since the velcro wears out in short order..

So, I take the apron over to my leather guys and ask him about how much he would want to do the fixings to bring the apron up to the point of what I want..

Change the outside edge to make it wider, move the pockets down torwards the bottom and put a proper belt on it with proper leg straps..

With out loosing a breath I then asked how much he would want to make me one to my specs..

Without missing a beat he said well. I really don't want the job..

I then said": Well, I'd just make it myself if I had a sewing machine since the stitching by hand would take way to long.

He said, really are you sure you could handle it?

I said you betcha...

He then said well.. Why don't you come over here and use my machines?

I said SURE!!!

We then talked about the most durable leather and he said Bison would be best..

So for starters he ordered up some 7-8oz brain tanned Bison..

Came in a few days ago and today we got a start on it..

Vern2
08-24-2012, 10:10 PM
I'm impressed also. Go for it! :D

I set down to weld and use plasma. With plasma I just move my knees and feet away from falling steel and downward sparks. I have a leather knee bib I bought at my welding store, Phoenix Welding. Most of the time I just lay it over my lap, an apron would be nice. My son was amazed at how many black burnt spots that were on both sides. :eek:

I like your gumption.

1911man
08-24-2012, 10:22 PM
Jen, is there anything you can't/ won't do?:)

brucew
08-25-2012, 05:36 AM
Jen, is there anything you can't/ won't do?:)

I was just going to say that. Jen always amazes me.

JWS
08-25-2012, 06:40 AM
Jen, mine has a good belt and buckle on the back. My old one used leather strings, but the wider belt and good buckle digs in less. For my leg straps, I punched holes and reinforced with round metal grommets. Then I used leather laces/strings with a clip snap. I have had some nails catch on the apron and break the leg strings, better they break than be pulled to the ground. So if you haven't considered building in a weak spot, should be considered.

LW Hiway
08-25-2012, 07:47 AM
Jen, is there anything you can't/ won't do? Blatant 'suckuppage'.:p But your right I guess.:)

At least Jen's not like some of our 'hippie' Smiths brethren wimmin and men I run into at times here in La. that wear open toe sandles while working during shows.:rolleyes:

Jens a 'plugger', not a 9 to 5'er.

greywynd
08-25-2012, 09:58 AM
Does this mean we're gonna get to see pics of Jen modelling leather?? :devil::devil:

In all seriousness though, having been around horses for a long time, farriers and all the rest, and even doing some occasional trimming, I know how important a good apron is for someone like yourself.

Also knowing a few folks in the leather side of things, and doing some on occasion myself, you've found a rarity in someone that will show you and help you do it yourself. While you're there, take note if there is something you can make or do for him to show your appreciation, I'm thinking something unique like you would forge or something along those lines.

As you know, there is nothing like a well made tool specifically made for an application, and I bet he's the sort that would realize that as well.

platypus20
08-25-2012, 10:33 AM
Does this mean we're gonna get to see pics of Jen modelling leather?? :devil::devil:




A strong, confident and intelligent woman in leather, this could be serious trouble.......:devil:

DrBob
08-25-2012, 10:48 AM
You go, girl!

DrBob

madam X
08-25-2012, 11:45 AM
Jen, you are fabulous! :)

And the leather guy letting you use his equipment is to be commended as well for his generosity.

We don't let just anyone ride our bike.;)

cutter
08-25-2012, 11:47 AM
We don't let just anyone ride our bike.;)
Or Forksnatch.

RED caddy
08-25-2012, 04:01 PM
Or the 'deer wagon...

RED

allessence
08-25-2012, 06:57 PM
Thanks all Guys and gals. This will be a group response if thats okay.. :)

You guys and gals are just as nutty as I am.. There are some very talented people on here and I'm sure there isn't one among you if you had the opertunity wouldn't take it to learn a different craft.. :D


One of my personal traits good, bad or indifferent:
I am not one to sit idley by and not put my hand in somehow.. The deal was I would use his equipment and he would assist..

Well, that went out the window.. I felt just about completely useless today since all I did was the design phase of this and figuring out where I wanted everything to go..

He did all the sewing, 90% of the cutting and 100% of I don't really understand why you are doing it that way..


Originally he had thought I would be using a very light and less sturdy apron..

The apron is going to be very heavy.. I figured better having to much material and cutting it down would be easier and less messy than adding pieces in..

It's come just about to full blossom though I can see all ready that there will need to be some changes but I feel so badly taking up his time..

As far as gifts are concerned: I did sharpen his scissors while I was there and maybe that might be a great gift.. A new pair of hand forged shears..


So the main body is made from brain tanned and smoked Bison split. The upper darker color is bison non split. The leg patches are oil tanned 10oz as will be the pockets tomorrow.. I am hoping the brain tanned Bison will hold up.

The belt is full grain 10oz Cow leather.

The leg straps of which there are 4 total are the same material as the patches.

It's pretty rigid and not as pliable as I'd like it to be but for my first proto type I think I'll get some good first time use out of it before I start cutting into it.

allessence
08-25-2012, 07:08 PM
Here you can see the top pads added and how big the apron actually is..

You can see the sparks in the machine behind the leather man.. This machine is used to split leather. Split FYI it cuts the leather to a predetermined thickness. If you guys have ever watched the MOD squad the leather moc's the actor was wearing on all the episodes were made by this guy..


I don't have any pic's with me wearing it but tomorrow is pocket day so Ill model it once it's done.

H80N
08-25-2012, 07:09 PM
Jen..

neat project....
a little bit of Lexol wiped on the stiffer parts should help speed the break in and encourage suppleness as you use it...(agway usually carries it:devil:)

allessence
08-25-2012, 07:11 PM
Here are the leg straps attached and the pads fully sewn on.

allessence
08-25-2012, 07:23 PM
Jen..

neat project....
a little bit of Lexol wiped on the stiffer parts should help speed the break in and encourage suppleness as you use it...(agway usually carries it:devil:)

Thanks.

Funny you should mention that..

He sells his own brand of leather oil.. I asked him about treating the leather with something to hasten breakin and to nurish the leather and he said I should never have to treat it with anything.. Of course I'm not one to listen.:devil:

In my research on leather and the different processes of tanning it basically came down to 3 different types.

Oil, chrome and brain.. Oil being the most stable and strength, then chrome then brain tanning which is the oldest method.

I hope the bison holds up.. It's pretty flexible and very supple.. Since I am no leather expert I always how doubts as to the strength of something until put into use.

Charlie C
08-25-2012, 07:29 PM
Jenn, if for what ever reason they don't work for the apron, they will work for chaps and bucking hay.:D I made a pair of chaps when I was about 18 and used them when I was stacking hay.

allessence
08-25-2012, 07:30 PM
Jen, mine has a good belt and buckle on the back. My old one used leather strings, but the wider belt and good buckle digs in less. For my leg straps, I punched holes and reinforced with round metal grommets. Then I used leather laces/strings with a clip snap. I have had some nails catch on the apron and break the leg strings, better they break than be pulled to the ground. So if you haven't considered building in a weak spot, should be considered.

When you say strings you mean more like a mule skinners apron? Kind of like a handymans apron with a split down the middle but using ties for waist strap and legs?


My current apron uses some leg straps I had the same leather guy make for me when the apron was brand new many years back.. I've had great service from them so when back to the same type for the lower leg..

The upper thigh was plagueing me since I didn't have a good way to attach them to the Bison hide.. The material is pretty thin there so I opted to sew the straps on with buckles which I dont' really like . We'll have to see how they work..

Sorry but I couldn't come up with any better of and idea..

At this point I've used nearly 20sqft of leather..


Here is his (Herbie's) website..


http://www.pelkeymade.com/

H80N
08-25-2012, 07:30 PM
Thanks.

Funny you should mention that..

He sells his own brand of leather oil.. I asked him about treating the leather with something to hasten breakin and to nurish the leather and he said I should never have to treat it with anything.. Of course I'm not one to listen.:devil:

In my research on leather and the different processes of tanning it basically came down to 3 different types.

Oil, chrome and brain.. Oil being the most stable and strength, then chrome then brain tanning which is the oldest method.

I hope the bison holds up.. It's pretty flexible and very supple.. Since I am no leather expert I always how doubts as to the strength of something until put into use.

one more... vegatable tan... Tannic acid.. (used to be harvested from oak trees) thus the term "Oak Tanned"

http://www.braintan.com/barktan/2tannins.htm

allessence
08-26-2012, 07:08 AM
one more... vegatable tan... Tannic acid.. (used to be harvested from oak trees) thus the term "Oak Tanned"

http://www.braintan.com/barktan/2tannins.htm

Nice article on tanning..

I have learned a ton on it since I started this project.. Funny thing is as with all processes it seems there is so much depth..

Brian C.
08-26-2012, 07:57 AM
Looks like a fine project. I love the looks of that mans shop, it reminds me of part of Dad's orthopedic shop and also a good friends shoe repair business. Precious memories.

cutter
08-26-2012, 12:05 PM
I love the looks of that mans shop,
Yep, and those 2 hunnerd dollar mocassins.
Those are splendid.
And I love that he has one price.
"You want a pair of my mocassins? $200.
Oh - and send me your foot so I can be sure they fit." :)

allessence
08-26-2012, 04:38 PM
Yep, and those 2 hunnerd dollar mocassins.
Those are splendid.
And I love that he has one price.
"You want a pair of my mocassins? $200.
Oh - and send me your foot so I can be sure they fit." :)

Was funny while I was there today 4 people came in who had boughten his Moc's in the past..

One guy said he has been waiting for 2 years to make it back to the shop to buy another pair since his had finailly worn out after 18 years.. and hasnt' been around MA at all. They were just passing thru and this was stop #1..

The other guy and gal who came in said he owns like 5 pairs.. It's all he wears and he keeps a brand new pair in the closet just because he loves them so much and isn't sure how much longer Mr Pelkey is gonna be around.. While I was there he ordered another pair.. :D

If you figure in what it costs for materials and then the hand labor to make them the moc's are actually a deal.

The leather is a extremely tough grade and as a test he has a test sample that is held together with but a few strands each end and it has no give at all while pulling on it.

If he made moc's with a heel I'd buy a pair.. Especially now that I can fully see what materials and skills are used to make them..

Dollar for dollar he is way undercharging for what the item is..

cutter
08-26-2012, 04:53 PM
Dollar for dollar he is way undercharging for what the item is..

I really don't doubt it. They are impressive.

I have a pair from LLBean that have served me very well for several years but I don't expect they're in the same league with those Pelkey's.
Wilson disposed of the laces for me, lying at my feet under this desk last year when he was a puppy. I didn't even feel it happening. :)
Didn't matter to me; in fact, it improved them since they no longer get hung on anything or come untied.

Considering that they're more of a mass-produced item, the Bean mocassins really are very nice.

allessence
08-26-2012, 04:57 PM
Okay now.. I was able to get the apron done, done, done, done, done!!!!!!!!!!!!!


It came out pretty awesome and today I was allowed to do just about all of the work.. I guess because it was just about all hand sewing.

I learned a lot and it's been a great adventure and it was really nice spending time with some wonderful folks.....

I'm a very lucky person.

H80N
08-26-2012, 05:10 PM
Okay now.. I was able to get the apron done, done, done, done, done!!!!!!!!!!!!!


It came out pretty awesome and today I was allowed to do just about all of the work.. I guess because it was just about all hand sewing.

I learned a lot and it's been a great adventure and it was really nice spending time with some wonderful folks.....

I'm a very lucky person.


Very cool, cool, cool...

and... you modeled it.!! :D

cutter
08-26-2012, 06:09 PM
Think Billy Crystal here: "mahvelous, mahvelous!"
That is good looking work.


I learned a lot and it's been a great adventure and it was really nice spending time with some wonderful folks.....

I'm a very lucky person.
Yep, you got people, Jenn. :)
You know, I've contemplated moving away from here a couple of times over the years. God knows the scenery doesn't keep me here.

What it always comes down to is the people. Over the course of almost 50 years, I've met so many good, skilled and helpful people that I can turn to for their expertise or advice in their areas of competence.
I cannot put a value on them but I'm not willing to give it up.
I am losing them now & then over time, but not all at once.

People like your Herbie really are priceless.

milomilo
08-26-2012, 06:24 PM
What did the bison hide run a square foot? Have any idea how many sf in a bison hide?

Rich59
08-26-2012, 07:33 PM
I made a few sheaths for knives from heavy leather. I thought that was hard but I now see what a real leather project looks like. That's a very impressive apron and you look good in leather.

madam X
08-26-2012, 07:47 PM
you look good in leather.


Yes she does! http://cutterod.com/bear_stuff/LGoL/dominatrix2.jpg


Very cool apron, Jenn. It will serve you well. http://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/images/icons/icon14.gif

DrBob
08-26-2012, 08:19 PM
Good job, Jen! I just love that Mr. Pelkey was willing to lend his skill and expertise to this project. I have to find a way to get measured so that he can make a pair of mocs for me!

The apron came out great! It resembles the farrier's aprons I remember from working on the university farm in Athens, OH many years ago. I remember that those aprons had a kind of pouch which the farrier could use to rest the animals hoof so that s/he wasn't bearing the weight with the arms all the time. I'm sure you know what I'm talking about although I can barely remember it. (1957) -!

I hope it works out well for you.

DrBob

Yes she does! http://cutterod.com/bear_stuff/LGoL/dominatrix2.jpg

Now we need pictures of YOU in leather, Madam X :)

madam X
08-26-2012, 08:41 PM
Now we need pictures of YOU in leather, Madam X :)


Won't spandex do?

I have a lot of that. :)

digr
08-26-2012, 08:51 PM
Great looking job, it must of taken a lot of work:eek:

Scotts
08-26-2012, 10:21 PM
Well Done Young Lady!!! Well done!!! :)

I must confess a humorous image came to mind when I looked at the thumbnail pictures. Looked like them goat leggins used in the movie Dragnet.

Those look very good, are you going in cahoots with Mr. Pelkey?

Scott

1911man
08-26-2012, 10:31 PM
Great project and pics Jen. I'll bet you wouldn't even want to know what that apron would cost if you just gave him specs and said call me when it's done.

SmokinDodge
08-26-2012, 10:39 PM
It's funny how it went from "you do it here "to "I'll help you." Very nice job on both your parts!

Here there is a Amish man with a harness shop and it looks very much like that shop. I love to go in there, the different equipment and smell is just wonderful. The horse shit I could do without............;)

Dr Dean
08-26-2012, 10:52 PM
Nice looking apron Jenn. I could have used them today working on the neighbors shetland.

AJinNZ
08-26-2012, 10:57 PM
REALLY nice work. I doubt you will ever wear that out.

I have done a good bit of research on brain tanning, got skins in the freezer waiting even................From what I have read brain tan is the strongest of the lot as the fibers have not been chemically degraded.

If I could get bison leather here I would be delighted, if I could brain tan bison I would go into orbit...........

Samcord
08-27-2012, 02:46 AM
Jen,

I'm betting that Mr Pelkey enjoyed sharing his craft with you as much as you enjoyed learning from him.

I'm adding a visit to his shop to my bucket list.

digger doug
08-27-2012, 06:08 AM
O.k. seems I'm a bit late to this party.

A couple of questions I haven't seen answered yet.

1. "Brain tanned" I might not want to know.
2. Moc's....does he make a steel toed version ?
I might just become a customer.
3. Bison leather ? Wouldn't the fur make a nice
fashion statement ? or does it just catch on fire ?

allessence
08-27-2012, 06:22 AM
What did the bison hide run a square foot? Have any idea how many sf in a bison hide?

I have found that it can run from 2.99sqft to 14.00 sqft.. depends on where you look and what type (side, neck, back, full hide and then how supple it is and whether it's been split or not) Also, depends on how it have been tanned..

Doing this project again. I'd use an oil tanned Bison and get a full side..

I made a few sheaths for knives from heavy leather. I thought that was hard but I now see what a real leather project looks like. That's a very impressive apron and you look good in leather.


Thanks.. ignorance is bliss.. Sometimes it just better not knowing what your getting into.. :D

allessence
08-27-2012, 06:28 AM
Yes she does! http://cutterod.com/bear_stuff/LGoL/dominatrix2.jpg


Very cool apron, Jenn. It will serve you well. http://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/images/icons/icon14.gif

Thanks.. I am hoping it will work the way I have planned. it's pretty heavy so that might be the only down fall.. Tuesday I'll get a chance to use it..



Good job, Jen! I just love that Mr. Pelkey was willing to lend his skill and expertise to this project. I have to find a way to get measured so that he can make a pair of mocs for me!

The apron came out great! It resembles the farrier's aprons I remember from working on the university farm in Athens, OH many years ago. I remember that those aprons had a kind of pouch which the farrier could use to rest the animals hoof so that s/he wasn't bearing the weight with the arms all the time. I'm sure you know what I'm talking about although I can barely remember it. (1957) -!

I hope it works out well for you.

DrBob



Now we need pictures of YOU in leather, Madam X :)

Dr Bob, aprons and styles have changed over the years. for awhile just about ever apron out there had quick release everything.. Seems like as with clothing that aprons have fad trends as well.

I'd love to see and example of the apron you were reffering to.. Usually one just has to squeeze ones thighs together to hold the hoof..

allessence
08-27-2012, 07:09 AM
Great looking job, it must of taken a lot of work:eek:

right around 14hrs.. Mr Pelkey moves at a very quick pace.. I am sure I slowed him down alot. Part of it was the design factor since I have never seen and apron designed quite this way. I have large thighs.. right around 26" around and I have a 35" inseam so just about all the aprons I have ever tried are to short both in length and width..

So here you can how worn out my old apron is.. You can easily see where the wear patterns are on both lower thighs.. The main problem here is the top pad was getting worn out over the stitching so no matter how many times I got it resewn the stitching would only take a few rasp strokes and be loose again..

Also I would hit the knife pockets.

On the new apron you can see there is no place for the rasp to either hit the pad edge/stitching or the pockets.. :D

Well Done Young Lady!!! Well done!!! :)

I must confess a humorous image came to mind when I looked at the thumbnail pictures. Looked like them goat leggins used in the movie Dragnet.

Those look very good, are you going in cahoots with Mr. Pelkey?

Scott I've known Mr Pelkey for about 18years.. I'd stop by for him to fix stuff.. Funny thing is he doesn't remember me from way back then or even the time before which was about 8 years ago when I had him put leg straps on my old apron..

So, yes I will be visiting him on a more regular basis if I can find the time. As we all know in todays life style it's hard to find extra time for anything.

Great project and pics Jen. I'll bet you wouldn't even want to know what that apron would cost if you just gave him specs and said call me when it's done.


Your absolutely right on that one. Besides that he said he would have basically just put tie straps on the apron cut it out to a straight apron pattern and called it done..

So when I explained what I really wanted he shook his head and said okay lets see what it comes out to look like.


It's funny how it went from "you do it here "to "I'll help you." Very nice job on both your parts!

Here there is a Amish man with a harness shop and it looks very much like that shop. I love to go in there, the different equipment and smell is just wonderful. The horse shit I could do without............;)

Leather does have a nice smell to it.. I fully understand what your talking about since I'm such a tooly..

I'd rather have my hands in horse poop then dog poop.. I had read somewhere that they used to use a fermented dog poop for tanning leather... :eek:

Nice looking apron Jenn. I could have used them today working on the neighbors shetland.


If you want I'll send it to you for breaking in.. It weighs a good 20 lbs and the legs are pretty stiff.. I can't picture trying to get in under some shetlands with this apron on unless I put 1 knee on the ground..

Hope they stood well for you..

allessence
08-27-2012, 07:19 AM
O.k. seems I'm a bit late to this party.

A couple of questions I haven't seen answered yet.

1. "Brain tanned" I might not want to know.
2. Moc's....does he make a steel toed version ?
I might just become a customer.
3. Bison leather ? Wouldn't the fur make a nice
fashion statement ? or does it just catch on fire ?

It's on older method of tanning since from what I had read it takes about 1 brain to do 1 skin.. So if you have a squirrel or rabbit etc, etc you only need the whole animal to tan a skin..

You mash the brains then par boil the mixture then filter it and this is what you use..

I'm not sure on the steel toed version.. You could email him. He'd probably make a double thickness of leather on the toes which sounds kind of neat..

The hair is very slippery.. a better surface would maybe be some open face neoprene.. something sticky to hold the hoof in position.

Bison has some of the toughest leather/hind out of all the cultivated animals of any volume.

It can be quite soft but still very durable.

allessence
08-27-2012, 07:29 AM
I posted up some of these pictures all ready but just wanted to recap the leg width and the wear patterns which on the new apron have basically been eliminated.

The brown apron is one I had boughten just before I made the new one..

you can see where the pockets are as well as where the side seames are..

Both of which are in direct line with the rasp flow direction..

I might have gotten a year of use out of the apron till I knocked the pocket off..

digger doug
08-27-2012, 08:06 AM
I'm not sure on the steel toed version.. You could email him. He'd probably make a double thickness of leather on the toes which sounds kind of neat..

.

Well, no I would rather the toe be thin. To be more flexable, most
are stiff.

The steel toe's, I kept some old ones that fit real well.

Best I can tell, there's (2) kind of steel toes available.
Normal, and "Oblique".

The Oblique is wider and more squared, give me some "toe wriggling room".
(which is handy when I have to count above 10.....:D)

allessence
08-27-2012, 09:06 AM
Back in the day. I had to wear steel toed shoes and even today if you go to Farrier school a lot of schools make it manditory for steel toes..


Me in all the years of experience with horses, not once while I was wearing steel toed shoes did the horses ever step on my toes.. They would go straight for the instep.. in this position the steel toe box does nothing..

I haven't worn steel toed shoes now in maybe 15 years and don't envy anybody who does..

Last steel toed shoes I had were Dr Martens. for some reason it seems when I have steel toed shoes on I end up wearing the leather in fron of the toe box out early.

digger doug
08-27-2012, 09:12 AM
Yup, required. It's o.k., been wearing since I was 16.

Seeing how Carolina's now made in China, and cost upwards
of $120, if your friends $200 had a steel toe stitched in them,
they would be a good deal. The carolina 6" with the "oblique"s steel,
is made of a real thick, tough leather, looks like greased bacon.

Dairy farmer says, that yes, cow goes closer to ankle, behind toe,
and had one crimp steel over toe (couldn't get off shoe) :eek:

DrBob
08-27-2012, 05:31 PM
I'd love to see and example of the apron you were reffering to.. Usually one just has to squeeze ones thighs together to hold the hoof..

Jenn going on my foggy memory it seems to me the farrier straddled the leg and held the hoof then hooked what looked like a soft, wide leather - not really a strap - across. Then s/he could let go and reach for something like a shoe. I suppose the squeeze the thighs method would be quicker and great for your adductor muscles!

To be clear, I wasn't an aggie student but I was required to take courses in microbiology. The head of that dept. at OU was also the Commissioner of the Athens County Board of Health. His senior students were his labor force. We got $0.65/hr for testing milk, milking equipment animal stool samples and other yummie stuff.

I used to go out to the farm that the university had set up for its agricultural students a lot. They taught all skills from horseshoeing to tractor maintenance and of course soil irrigation crop rotation and all that "farm stuff".

As a "New Yawkah" I got a real education. My favorite story was of my going out to a local dairy to check the milk. I came upon the dairyman just as he was fishing a dead rat out of a milk can. I guess the rat slipped and drowned.

The guy held the rat by the tail and squeezed all the milk out of his fur so as not to waste any! He turned around to see me writing a citation.

I'll try to look online to see if I can find anything like that apron. It may have been a "special" designed to help the instructors teach students.


DrBob

allessence
08-27-2012, 06:36 PM
DrB..

Being tied into any horse is just a bad idea.. Years back one of the big selling points were aprons that had break away straps..

Then velcro came on the scene and that became the fast break away.


I personally have never had a horse stuck in my apron.. I can see where this would be a very scary place to be.. Most people don't really realize just how strong a horse is.. coupled with a close to 1000lbs animal just makes for a bad combo..


my 3 worse times working on horses were while I was an apprentice..


1. Horse named Casper (big white 16hand stallion) just bred 4 mares that morning. I was working on the rear foot and was completely under the horse working on and outside flare.. (anybody who works on horses knows exactly the position I'm talking about) One of the handles brought a mare a little to close and he got a sniff of some ladies fair and the stallion jumped straight up in the air and pushed me right down onto the ground basically completely collapsing me into a pancake and then started jumping up and down on me.. Luckily my only injury was a pinched calf muscle from him landing on it. Thankfully my leg was flat on the cement so when he came down it flattened out against the flat cement but didn't break since it was flat..

2. Another event horse.. 16 hands.. he was just nasty.. Anyhow the person who owned him just loved to ride him..

I was first up and I noticed he had thrush in the tip of the frog.. Pulled my hoof knife and first swipe the blood spurted right across the room. My boss looked at me and said you did it you fix it..

I had to heat up an old rasp and cauterize the tip of the frog.. That frigin horse shook me to no end. I just about broke my ankle holding that foot while I was getting slammed around and up against the walll..

Took me 3 tries but got it taken care of.. If that wasn't punishment enough I had to finish up the last 3 horses by myself..


3. I was working on a fat quater horse and had just put a rear shoe on and the nails were still sticking out.

He looked right at me and kicked me with that foot.. He caught me right in the back of my hand.. luckily I was fast enough and he puntured my hand with 1 nail out of the 6 in the shoe and I was able to withdraw my hand before he put his foot down..

My hand only hurt for about a week from the nail puncture and egg beating of the inside tissues..

Been kicked twice and thrashed around the fair amount but this is common for new horses since they are usually pretty beat up from the previous farrier.. After a few visits they usuallly just fall asleep.. :D

I'd love to see how he did it..

Scrapper Greg
08-27-2012, 07:28 PM
Aesome apron, Jen! Hopeit works well for you. It's nice to be able to design something and get that extra use out of it.

allessence
08-28-2012, 08:53 PM
Thanks Greg,,


Today I got to use the apron for the first time. Worked on 3 horses.. The apron works great. Is pretty comfortable for how much it weighs but I did notice that the bottom is a little to rigid.. Enough so that it doesn't drape quite right..

Tomorrow I have 2 horses all the way around with shoes and then 2 trims.. I'll post back tomorrow for update.

CEC
08-28-2012, 09:44 PM
Jen,
Great thread and good looking apron.

I've seen my father trim hoofs before on the horses we had as a kid. Never saw a professional though.

Boogity
08-29-2012, 03:29 AM
<snip> I was first up and I noticed he had thrush in the tip of the frog. Pulled my hoof knife and first swipe the blood spurted right across the room. My boss looked at me and said you did it you fix it.
Can you tells us what "thrush" and "frog" means? Thanks.

allessence
08-29-2012, 04:18 AM
Can you tells us what "thrush" and "frog" means? Thanks.

Sorry about that.. Thrush is an anorobic bactieria that will eat the frog..

The frog is the central rear portion in a horses foot. It extends from the rear (heels) to about the middle of the foot and comes to a point.. It is triangular in shape from back to front..

I've attached a picture of the bottom of a horses foot..

Today this picture would be called a distorted foot since the ratios are off but you'll get the idea..

I've also attached a pdf, it gives some general info on thrush as well.. :)

Boogity
08-29-2012, 02:19 PM
Thanks, Jen. I had an idea but needed some backup 'cause I do get things wrong sometimes. OK, a lot.

Dave Lee
08-30-2012, 01:47 AM
Nice job on the apron, Jen. It's great to have someone like your friend to turn to, to get you through a project. I gotta say, you're one hard working lady!

Dave

nctox
08-30-2012, 06:11 AM
I ejoyed this thread, Jen. And I learned a bit too.:D

DrBob
08-30-2012, 09:35 PM
Great answer, Jenn. I am probably mis-remembering:confused:

I'm glad the new apron is working out well.

DrBob

kiwi
08-30-2012, 09:45 PM
Beautiful job.
Nick

allessence
08-31-2012, 09:02 AM
Nice job on the apron, Jen. It's great to have someone like your friend to turn to, to get you through a project. I gotta say, you're one hard working lady!

Dave

Thanks, Jen. I had an idea but needed some backup 'cause I do get things wrong sometimes. OK, a lot.



Thanks guys.. It's been a learning process.. I'm still amazed at how strong leather can really be..

I went yesterday back to see Mr Pelkey to do a few modifications to the apron.. At this point I have 2 shoeings and 10 trims and I found that with the pad leather as thick as it is though getting more supple was increasing the amount of labor going out into the trimming/shoeing since every rasp stroke was being diverted by the lower part of the apron..

My worst fears have been realized as with any proto type it's money well spent but also it's money spent..

So, back to the pictures..

I had the bottom portion of the apron modified to configure more around my knee which I hope makes it easier to get my rasp into position..

Ideally I can see another apron coming down the road sometime soon as is another set of hoof knives and a new hoof stand..

The new apron will be made from oil tanned Bison with oil tanned Bison knee pads.. The flexibility of this stuff is good but also stronger..


1,2, 3 are off the modifications.. Reason why I don't like the mod is it puts the stitching right in line with the rasp and is the reason why I designed the apron with full pads instead of just a pad over the knee..

The 4th pic is of the interior part of the foot for those that are curious..

Never know if it comes up on trivia pursuit.. :)

JWS
08-31-2012, 09:28 AM
Don't cha just hate breaking in a new apron??!!! Like getting a new pair of boots. uuuuugggggghhhhhhhh. Steel toed boots, in 1977 went to an Amishman's shop as he had a dealership in boots, while waiting for him to finish shoeing this big belgian gelding that horse which had to of weighed close to a ton jumped straight up in the air, all four hooves off of the ground and landed on the toe of the guy's foot. Landed on the rear of the steel toe, curled it into the man's foot basically where his toes attach to his feet. Ended up cutting his boot off of his foot, still had to go to the hospital. Didn't buy steel toed boots that day or any day. Have had all toes broken at one time or another.
When I went to shoeing school, the instructor had a garden hose running and had all of us take our new shoeing aprons and throw them in that mudhole. He said nothing screamed "greenhorn" more than a bunch of new aprons! I have my welding students throw their new greens on the floor and walk on them also.:devil:

Brian C.
09-01-2012, 07:39 AM
When I went to shoeing school, the instructor had a garden hose running and had all of us take our new shoeing aprons and throw them in that mudhole. He said nothing screamed "greenhorn" more than a bunch of new aprons! I have my welding students throw their new greens on the floor and walk on them also.:devil:

Sounds like some rookie Firefighters I have seen rooting around in charred debris trying to look like they have done something.:devil:

allessence
09-01-2012, 09:35 AM
Don't cha just hate breaking in a new apron??!!! Like getting a new pair of boots. uuuuugggggghhhhhhhh. Steel toed boots, in 1977 went to an Amishman's shop as he had a dealership in boots, while waiting for him to finish shoeing this big belgian gelding that horse which had to of weighed close to a ton jumped straight up in the air, all four hooves off of the ground and landed on the toe of the guy's foot. Landed on the rear of the steel toe, curled it into the man's foot basically where his toes attach to his feet. Ended up cutting his boot off of his foot, still had to go to the hospital. Didn't buy steel toed boots that day or any day. Have had all toes broken at one time or another.
When I went to shoeing school, the instructor had a garden hose running and had all of us take our new shoeing aprons and throw them in that mudhole. He said nothing screamed "greenhorn" more than a bunch of new aprons! I have my welding students throw their new greens on the floor and walk on them also.:devil:

Ah, glad to hear I'm not the only person who has had that experience.. I have gotten good over the years at being able to curl my toes up in my shoes for that once or twice a year time when the horse does decide to step on my toes. :D

I'm not ashamed of having a new apron. Mind you I don't think I would take an apron that costs 250-300.00 and throw it into a mud puddle..

My last apron cost me 68.00 and that was the one I just retired. The new apron I bought which I returned was 264.00 and the one I just made cost me 320.00.

I think now that items cost so much that they should get better respect..

GE 15" nippers 200.00 per pair
saveedge 14" rasp 27.00 each
Prefferd hoof mill 56.00 each..

1 horse shoe nail 10 cents each..


I think my tool box has more than quadrupled in price in the last 10 years.

JWS
09-01-2012, 11:23 AM
You have THE BEST nippers made with those GE's! They are life saving sharp letting us use less energy cutting hooves. I bought new rasps monthly as they were the most labor intensive tool and dull ones cut my productivity. New one used on only hooves, old one under nails and meeting hoof to shoe. Funny thing, had a guy that thought I was nuts and would buy my old rasps for darn near what I paid new so it really didn't cost me any money. Now I wish I had a pile of them for making damascus (sp?) knife blanks. The preferred hoof mill you talk of, don't know what you mean. Tried to google it but a bunch of junk came up. Would be interested in seeing it if you can find it online so I can read about it. I actually don't wear my apron now that I use my shoeing stocks. My daughters wear it as they like to do quick touch up on the hooves before they and their husbands go on a ride as I don't keep them "manicured" enough for them! Kind of neat watching my daughters do that job and their husbands stand with a weird look on their faces as they don't really understand the job as they aren't "horsemen".

Rich59
09-01-2012, 12:02 PM
I feel your pain on the cost of tools and consumables. Recently needed to replace my seven year old Dewalt cordless drill and circular saw. Thought I was going to have to get a mortgage to make the purchase.

Same day I ordered up consumables for my plasma cutter. Found out I had spent about $30 worth helping my nephew get the front fenders off his 48 ford pickup. Money and time well spent but when you look at the nozzles it's hard to understand why they are so costly.

allessence
09-01-2012, 01:56 PM
You have THE BEST nippers made with those GE's! They are life saving sharp letting us use less energy cutting hooves. I bought new rasps monthly as they were the most labor intensive tool and dull ones cut my productivity. New one used on only hooves, old one under nails and meeting hoof to shoe. Funny thing, had a guy that thought I was nuts and would buy my old rasps for darn near what I paid new so it really didn't cost me any money. Now I wish I had a pile of them for making damascus (sp?) knife blanks. The preferred hoof mill you talk of, don't know what you mean. Tried to google it but a bunch of junk came up. Would be interested in seeing it if you can find it online so I can read about it. I actually don't wear my apron now that I use my shoeing stocks. My daughters wear it as they like to do quick touch up on the hooves before they and their husbands go on a ride as I don't keep them "manicured" enough for them! Kind of neat watching my daughters do that job and their husbands stand with a weird look on their faces as they don't really understand the job as they aren't "horsemen".

Wow, did you get a set of portable stocks?

I love your Daugters have taken up the calling.. I love seeing other women getting out there and doing stuff.. It's been very freeing over the years..

I've attached a pic of the rasp as well as a PDF.

Should explain it more.. I have found that the hoof planes work well but I wouldn't say they are worth the extra money..

One place that I do see an advantage is I don't cut my fingers on them unlike a new rasp..

I don't wear gloves when I work.. :eek:

allessence
09-01-2012, 01:59 PM
I feel your pain on the cost of tools and consumables. Recently needed to replace my seven year old Dewalt cordless drill and circular saw. Thought I was going to have to get a mortgage to make the purchase.

Same day I ordered up consumables for my plasma cutter. Found out I had spent about $30 worth helping my nephew get the front fenders off his 48 ford pickup. Money and time well spent but when you look at the nozzles it's hard to understand why they are so costly.


I used to not worry about replacement costs of things so much, but now that the price of items have gone up consistantly over the years and the profits per hour have diminished it seems I'm counting just about every nickel..

I guess with that being said it's the reason why I get so much done with so little. Or I guess what I should have said is it used to be that way..

platypus20
09-01-2012, 03:06 PM
Same day I ordered up consumables for my plasma cutter. Found out I had spent about $30 worth helping my nephew get the front fenders off his 48 ford pickup. Money and time well spent but when you look at the nozzles it's hard to understand why they are so costly.

By the time I figure in cutting speed, consumable durability, time saved and a few other factors, I find plasma cutter consumables to be rather cheap. I've find the consumables, with clean dry air, last a long time and I cut slimy, scaly and dirty steel on a day to day basis.