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  #1  
Old 04-26-2005, 11:07 PM
Amalgam Amalgam is offline
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Default Make your own electric /wire brush/polisher/buffer.

Hey you guys,
I just finished looking at a website that offers some videos on metal sculpture. In one of the videos' previews you can see a guy who built his own electric wire brush/polisher/buffer using an electric motor. I remember that the last time I went to my HF local store I saw some electric motors very cheap. So I wonder if I will be able to build one of those using one of those motors that are way cheaper than a manufacturer made polisher/buffer. Any idea, previous thread (I did not find any), plans, advice?
Thank you
Alfredo
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  #2  
Old 04-26-2005, 11:51 PM
david_r david_r is offline
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Alfredo,
HF should be able to help.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=46622
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=46623

Unfortunately,
That'll only give you one side. You'll soon find it's a PITA to be changing wheels all the time.
Another solution is a belt drive mandrel. Caswell Plating calls it a Bench Mandrel. It consists of a pulley, 2 pillow block bearings and a shaft with one end left threaded and the other right threaded. Your motor sits behind it and drive it with a belt.
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  #3  
Old 04-27-2005, 12:00 AM
Wyoming
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Alfredo, A fuller source for your needs...though I seem to remember they had a high minimum order to be able to receive the cheaper of two prices listed for each item...would be www.prairietool.com

Try page 14 for ball bearing grinders/less motors or page 16 for a wide range of ball bearing mandrels.

If you want to go low, low bucks...start drifting through the junk shops looking for grinder jacks and mandrels or make your own with pillow blocks.

As far as Harbor Freight for cheap motors goes...America throws away major amounts of good material. I would think that in an area with your population density you would have a number of good scrap yards to check for junked equipment with perfectly operational motors. Even here on the edge of civilization one can be picky about a scrap motor's parentage.
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  #4  
Old 04-27-2005, 12:06 AM
david_r david_r is offline
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Good point Wyoming. I work in scrap yards many days out of the month and walk by piles of 1/2 to 1 1/2 HP single phase motors. I'd bet a dollar 99% of them have either a bad capacitor, a dirty contact in the startup switch or a noisy bearing.

One thing I don't see many of is dual shaft motors. Then again, a mandrel will fix that and allow Alfredo to vary speeds with a pulley change.
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  #5  
Old 04-27-2005, 12:18 AM
Wyoming
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David, If the motor is still attached to the equipment it came in with there is a better than even chance that nothing whatsoever is wrong with the motor. To make the odds work for you...do a simple spin of the shaft and feel and listen while doing it..or take a sniff and see if you smell burnt windings or other electrical problems. I bring home motors at 10-15 cents a pound (depending upon who is working the front counter) and don't mind running the occassional one back that is beyond hope.
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  #6  
Old 04-27-2005, 12:32 AM
david_r david_r is offline
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I hear ya Wyoming. Thing is, if I'm in a scrapyard, I'm there making money. That 10-15 cent a pound (25 cents here on the coast) is costing me a whole lot more than that just to stop and look at it. Then again, maybe I should just bill it to the yard. After all, they'll have me search a pile of scrap for 30 minutes to find a straight 4 foot section of 1.5 inch angle iron. How's that saying go? Oh yeah, Pennywise and pound foolish.

I checked out those prairie tool mandrels. Those sure are nice looking. Too bad they're limited to 1725 RPM. I did notice they have the left hand arbors so if Alfredo can find a dual shaft motor, he can mount two wheels at a time.
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  #7  
Old 04-27-2005, 12:43 AM
Franz Franz is offline
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Buffers require horsepower if you're doing any serious work with one. There is far more drag on a 10" cloth wheel than there is on a 10" grinding wheel.
Buffing is also speed sensitive, different materials require different feet per minute, or you burn things.
Back in the good days, before OSHA, we could buy Lindsey arbours and saw arbours, along with belt driven buffing mandrels. Those items seem to no longer be available, so stupid people can be safe.
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  #8  
Old 04-27-2005, 12:57 AM
Wyoming
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Franz, Not all that safe...Da##, I dislike extolling the product line of Grizzly, but check out item # H3559...belt drive buffer. Overpriced and of dubious parentage, but there it is.
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  #9  
Old 04-27-2005, 02:05 AM
Bolt Bolt is offline
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Where do yall get your buffing disks, and where could I find them localy?

Is there one that will mount on a 4.5 inch grinder, so I can do some on site buffing, as one on a bench grinder wouldn't help me too much.
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  #10  
Old 04-27-2005, 02:57 AM
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Bolt, Never thought of using a 4 1/2" grinder for buffing. I suppose the buffs are out there. A quick look on the Internet at the Enco site didn't pull up anything specifically for a 4 1/2" grinder, but there were 4" buffs that "probably" would work with your grinder. "Probably" may mean that you might have to do a bit of adapting to get the arbor to work correctly, but I don't think it would involve too much effort or expense...if the buffing wheel's arbor is too large you might have to get a bushing, cut it down to proper width and insert that with the wheel before tightening down your spindle nut. If it is too small for your arbor...and I don't think this would be the case...just enlarge the hole. On a friend's buffs he purchased on eBay that were too small for his work arbor I just took a short section of pipe that was the right diameter, ground a cutting edge on the inside with a flared reamer and used my shop press to drive the piece of pipe through the buffs and down into a piece of scrap oak. Did a good enough job.
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