Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Metallurgy and Materials

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-12-2011, 11:40 PM
TxDoc TxDoc is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Wamba, Texas
Posts: 67
Question Painting Bare Metal

I bought a KMG belt grinder. It comes as a bare metal. I was going to clear coat it, but then considering I may paint it to match the stand I am building. Mainly want to keep it from rusting.

Is there anything special I should do in etching, priming, painting this? It is not going to a show, and I don't really need to spend $500 on special etching and painting products, I hope. Just simply want it to not rust and look professional.

If anyone has some experience with what may be best, I would appreciate the "do this", as well as the "don't do that" input.
Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-13-2011, 12:09 AM
bluechipmachineshop's Avatar
bluechipmachineshop bluechipmachineshop is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Centreville, Virginia
Posts: 190
Default

TxDoc,

I've always had good luck with Rustoleum enamel over bare metal (rusty metal primer if it was rusty), but I'm not real fussy. Good luck with the KMG, I've been planning (and planning, and planning.....) to build a grinder, just can't decide on a design. I'm envious.

Mick
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-13-2011, 05:53 AM
Matt G. Matt G. is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Wichita, KS
Posts: 64
Default

Bare metal really should be primed first. Clean it real well with a rag soaked in mineral spirits before you prime. Since it won't be sitting outside in the sun, you can get away with rattle can paint.

I have never been pleased with any can of Rustoleum I have ever used, and avoid Krylon...it sprays like crap and runs really easily.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-13-2011, 09:16 AM
Alden Sherrodd Alden Sherrodd is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: o
Posts: 166
Default

NAPA sells a self etching primer in spray cans, as I am sure other suppliers do as well. This is probably the easiest way to do a professional job.

~Alden
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-13-2011, 11:49 AM
gwiley gwiley is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Goochland, Va
Posts: 49
Default

I prefer acetone rather than mineral spirits for cleaning before priming - MS seems to leave an oily residue.

In most cases I prefer to prime with a rattle can for 2 coats (30 minutes apart) and follow with one or more finish coats a few hours after priming.
__________________
Hobart LX235
Victor OA Welding/Cutting torch
Bobcat 773
OWB - 10 cords per year
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-14-2011, 12:10 AM
MetalWolf's Avatar
MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Wilson Co.
Posts: 337
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TxDoc View Post
I bought a KMG belt grinder. It comes as a bare metal. I was going to clear coat it, but then considering I may paint it to match the stand I am building. Mainly want to keep it from rusting.

Is there anything special I should do in etching, priming, painting this? It is not going to a show, and I don't really need to spend $500 on special etching and painting products, I hope. Just simply want it to not rust and look professional.

If anyone has some experience with what may be best, I would appreciate the "do this", as well as the "don't do that" input.
Thanks
You can use a rust inhibitor called OSPHO not sure the correct spelling with out looking at the jug
But it will stop and keep it from rusting just brush it on and let dry and then prime it then paint it
Would not hurt to treat the stand either even though it says works best on metal with some rust on it, it will help protect new metal form rusting as well
__________________
"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to
do nothing." -Edmund Burke-
_________________________________________
Gone Blue & Tooled Out!
Welding
Auto Body
ATI tooling
Just too much to list!
Protected By!
K-9 Security Animal & Backed by The Big Bad Wolf
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-14-2011, 07:51 PM
smawgmaw's Avatar
smawgmaw smawgmaw is offline
Organic Composter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NA
Posts: 2,108
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
You can use a rust inhibitor called OSPHO not sure the correct spelling with out looking at the jug
But it will stop and keep it from rusting just brush it on and let dry and then prime it then paint it
Would not hurt to treat the stand either even though it says works best on metal with some rust on it, it will help protect new metal form rusting as well
+1 on the OSPHO. I have used it on several projects, especially ones that see a lot of time outdoors and it has done wonderful jobs of protecting the metal. Have even used it on the metal roof of my water well shed before applying the finish paint coat, with it holding up for many, many years.
__________________
Specs called for windoze xp or better, so I installed Linux!

A FEW OF MY TOYS

SolydX
LinuxMint
Makulu
Crunchbang
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-15-2011, 11:11 AM
Scrapper Greg's Avatar
Scrapper Greg Scrapper Greg is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: WV
Posts: 2,085
Default

Never tried OSPHO. I usually use laquer thinner with good results. The main thing is to get the contaninants off the surface to be painted. Always prime forst. It gives the paint somthing to stick to. Just use quality paints and they should last you a long time.
__________________
"A man's rights rest in three boxes: the ballot box, the jury box, and the cartridge box." -- Frederick Douglass

Last edited by Scrapper Greg; 09-15-2011 at 11:12 AM. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-16-2011, 12:37 AM
MetalWolf's Avatar
MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Wilson Co.
Posts: 337
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrapper Greg View Post
Never tried OSPHO. I usually use laquer thinner with good results. The main thing is to get the contaninants off the surface to be painted. Always prime forst. It gives the paint somthing to stick to. Just use quality paints and they should last you a long time.

Scrapper Greg......If you have the opertunity to
give OSPHO a try you wont be more surprised other than how well it works to kill rust and prevent rust not to mention how well the primer and paint will adheres to the objects you are painting With longer lasting results in rust prevention. Dollar for Dollar the OSPHO has for me been a more solid rust prevention. Where rust prevention is vital, Although there are a couple of other rust inhibiters on the market that are just as good if not better but a bit pricier than the OSPHO and a gallon goes a long way.
__________________
"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to
do nothing." -Edmund Burke-
_________________________________________
Gone Blue & Tooled Out!
Welding
Auto Body
ATI tooling
Just too much to list!
Protected By!
K-9 Security Animal & Backed by The Big Bad Wolf

Last edited by MetalWolf; 09-16-2011 at 07:26 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-16-2011, 08:34 AM
Bender's Avatar
Bender Bender is offline
One Lone Sub
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Nampa, ID
Posts: 3,792
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gwiley View Post
I prefer acetone rather than mineral spirits for cleaning before priming - MS seems to leave an oily residue.

In most cases I prefer to prime with a rattle can for 2 coats (30 minutes apart) and follow with one or more finish coats a few hours after priming.
I agree
__________________
Boise Paint Contractor
Facebook
How fortunate we are!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:
clyde@m2texas.net
clyde@m2texas.net
george@shopfloortalk.com bob@shopfloortalk.com
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.