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Old 07-22-2011, 11:15 AM
derekpfeiffer derekpfeiffer is offline
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Default Welding with suitcase welder

I've welded quite a bit with 12vs suitcase welders but never yet with flux core. I'm assuming that you just hook it to the - terminal of the powersource instead of the + since unlike a wirefeed there are no lugs to switch the polarity with. I've got two jobs coming up that I'll be needing to run flux core with. One I'll be running it off my XMT 304 and the other off the Bobcat 250NT. Obviously I'll switch my XMT to the v-sense setting and run the suitcase welder off CV, and while running it off the Bobcat I'll set the suitcase to CC.

Just wanting to make sure all my thoughts are correct on running this machine!!

Thanks guys!
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  #2  
Old 07-22-2011, 01:49 PM
TozziWelding TozziWelding is offline
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Just hook it up the same as always, only switch your leads if your running NR-211(E71T-11). Your Bobcat should have CV, everyone I have used had it, just make sure you plug in to the CV terminal.
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Old 07-22-2011, 02:39 PM
derekpfeiffer derekpfeiffer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TozziWelding View Post
Just hook it up the same as always, only switch your leads if your running NR-211(E71T-11). Your Bobcat should have CV, everyone I have used had it, just make sure you plug in to the CV terminal.
perfect! thanks for the info! I'll have to check his Bobcat. I've only used it a couple times to SMAW off of.
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  #4  
Old 07-23-2011, 08:15 AM
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precisionworks precisionworks is offline
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My Suitcase is the Miller 12RC, powered by a Trailblazer 302, and runs Lincoln NR212 more than 90% of the time.

I have no idea about the connection for a Bobcat, but there are lots of Bobcat owners who run either a Suitcase or a Lincoln feeder. I do have a few thoughts on running FC wire ...

If you have the funds, purchase a FC gun. Mine was an eBay purchase, and one of the best investments ever made for portable welding. It's a Miller FC-1260 Ironmate Gun, 350 Amps, 15 ft lead. Information here. Some of the online stores, like Cyberweld & WeldingSupply.com show them for only $222, but that's with the short 10' lead - which you do not want. The very heavy construction & the aluminum heat shield make this gun worth the money. I've beaten the crap out of mine, drug it through mud & standing water, used it to stop the fall of the 12RC from a manlift 50' up in the air (that hurt, as there was a new, 33# spool in the feeder). Tough gun. Lincoln makes a similar FC gun.

Decided on what wire you plan to use, make sure you have the correct liner installed, and be sure to install the correct drive rollers. Some FC wires are hard as a rock, including both Lincoln NR-211 and NR-212. A smooth V-groove roller will not reliably feed those wires, and neither will a smooth U-groove roller. Miller tech support suggested a serrated V-groove, and it feeds NR-212 perfectly. Suitcase accessories.

After you have the correct feed rollers, study the charts to determine a starting voltage & wire speed, then fine tune from that initial setting. Lincoln publishes a nice online booklet & I printed the page for NR-212 settings, had it laminated, and keep it in the bag with the Ironmate gun. All the FC wires require a large amount of stickout (or ESO). Learn that distance & try to stay with it.

FC wires, because they are hollow, weld like a solid wire that's one size smaller. If you would normally use .045" solid, go to .063-.068 FC. FWIW, .068" NR-212 is my "standard" wire, although I've run as small as .035" on thin materials like sheet metal.

You'll need to remove the flux coating after each weld pass, and can do that easily with a stringer-bead wire wheel on a 4.5" angle grinder. Or you can use a chipping hammer & it will be painfully slow & won't do as nice a job as the wire wheel. Take along a few extra wire wheels, as brushing FC wire really eats them up - I've gone through two or three in one eight hour day.
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Old 07-23-2011, 11:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by precisionworks View Post
My Suitcase is the Miller 12RC, powered by a Trailblazer 302, and runs Lincoln NR212 more than 90% of the time.

I have no idea about the connection for a Bobcat, but there are lots of Bobcat owners who run either a Suitcase or a Lincoln feeder. I do have a few thoughts on running FC wire ...

If you have the funds, purchase a FC gun. Mine was an eBay purchase, and one of the best investments ever made for portable welding. It's a Miller FC-1260 Ironmate Gun, 350 Amps, 15 ft lead. Information here. Some of the online stores, like Cyberweld & WeldingSupply.com show them for only $222, but that's with the short 10' lead - which you do not want. The very heavy construction & the aluminum heat shield make this gun worth the money. I've beaten the crap out of mine, drug it through mud & standing water, used it to stop the fall of the 12RC from a manlift 50' up in the air (that hurt, as there was a new, 33# spool in the feeder). Tough gun. Lincoln makes a similar FC gun.

Decided on what wire you plan to use, make sure you have the correct liner installed, and be sure to install the correct drive rollers. Some FC wires are hard as a rock, including both Lincoln NR-211 and NR-212. A smooth V-groove roller will not reliably feed those wires, and neither will a smooth U-groove roller. Miller tech support suggested a serrated V-groove, and it feeds NR-212 perfectly. Suitcase accessories.

After you have the correct feed rollers, study the charts to determine a starting voltage & wire speed, then fine tune from that initial setting. Lincoln publishes a nice online booklet & I printed the page for NR-212 settings, had it laminated, and keep it in the bag with the Ironmate gun. All the FC wires require a large amount of stickout (or ESO). Learn that distance & try to stay with it.

FC wires, because they are hollow, weld like a solid wire that's one size smaller. If you would normally use .045" solid, go to .063-.068 FC. FWIW, .068" NR-212 is my "standard" wire, although I've run as small as .035" on thin materials like sheet metal.

You'll need to remove the flux coating after each weld pass, and can do that easily with a stringer-bead wire wheel on a 4.5" angle grinder. Or you can use a chipping hammer & it will be painfully slow & won't do as nice a job as the wire wheel. Take along a few extra wire wheels, as brushing FC wire really eats them up - I've gone through two or three in one eight hour day.
+1 on everything Barry said. I have the same equipment, well worth the spend.
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  #6  
Old 07-25-2011, 09:21 AM
derekpfeiffer derekpfeiffer is offline
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Well I got one of the jobs done yesterday. 4 sets of handrails for a street project they did in town. I just used the FC to tack everything along the street in place, and then am bringing everything back to the shop to weld out and paint.

Thanks for the infor I'll have to look into one of those guns!

Thanks again guys!
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  #7  
Old 07-26-2011, 05:26 AM
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One more thing to watch - the serrated feed rollers deposit a lot of metal into the liner. If you blow out the liner at the end of each day, it feeds the wire more smoothly & will last about twice as long.
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Old 07-26-2011, 12:22 PM
derekpfeiffer derekpfeiffer is offline
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Yeah I've ran into that before! thanks for the tip though!!
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