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Old 04-18-2008, 09:21 AM
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Default 110 V MIG vs 220 v MIG

Just some notes I have from answering a question on another board and figured I post it here as a reference for anyone wanting to know.....
......any 110 volt machine....Miller, Hobart, Lincolin etc. even if it is a 135 140 etc will only put out the max 140 /135 for a very very short time....so to get 125 amps out of one on even a 20 amp breaker is asking alot.....look at the volt curves of say the HH140 under load it will only put out 17 volts @ 125 amps (tap 4) vs my HH210 it will put out 24 volts @ 125 amps (tap7) the HH210 will match the HH140's top end out put on tap #3 and on paper the HH210 will hit 125 amps on tap #2..... with solid 0.030 wire on tap #2 I can weld sheet metal.....yes it is only putting out 15 volts.....
Hope this is helpful for anyone looking @ getting a new MIG welder and pondering the validity of spending the extra cash for a 220 v machine.
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Old 04-18-2008, 12:57 PM
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I bought a Lincoln 135 sp+ a few years ago, and I enjoyed using it. I have had all sorts of practice with it, and will probably never part with it. It has been helpful for mobile work on buddies lawnmowers and stuff.

I must say though, It is time to move it up a ways... I need a 220V to do some bigger jobs. Now that I am getting better, I have had a few projects that I was welding for an extended amount of time, and the thing would just crap out on me. I had to wait for the guts to cool off and then go again.

Not all that fun. I would have loved to have had a 200v machine to just keep cranking through things.

Still the 110V machine has it's place and is pretty useful in certain situations.
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Old 04-18-2008, 01:42 PM
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Yes the 110 volt units do have a place....I'm glad that I had the HH140 as 220v access was not available to me at first so I was able to learn with it and sold it to a guy wanting to do body work and little repairs around his house lawn mowers etc...so it is perfect for him.......the big problem I see as of late is guys wanting to build bumpers and recovery point for there off road rigs and think that because some of the 110 v units are advertised for 1/4" that they can go and get one and be all set......yes you can weld thicker stuff than 1/8" with a 110v unit but the 220 v unit will do it faster and with better reliability than the 110 v unit. I posted the #'s to help make the picture a little clearer.
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Old 04-18-2008, 09:08 PM
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Yup, plain simple fact that historically 120V circuits are poor power sources for welding, can only get so much out of that socket.
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Old 04-19-2008, 08:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sberry View Post
Yup, plain simple fact that historically 120V circuits are poor power sources for welding, can only get so much out of that socket.

Untill you get into inverters like the Dynasty and the Passport. The first thing that literally blew my @$$ away was how good the Dynasty will work on 120v But a Transformer on 120v leaves a lot to be desired. IMO
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