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  #1  
Old 06-13-2010, 11:43 PM
Andyman Andyman is offline
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Default New mill/drill stand

I had the idea to building a new stand for my mill since i got it and as i accumulated some scrap this idea popped in my head.

things i wanted to improve with my new stand.
-----Make it taller i hate leaning over when i'm working with it. current height to the bottom of the vise is roughly 41" i figured the new height would be roughly 50-3/8" I'm a little concerned that raising it may make it more top heavy any thoughts? the new stand size is 48" x 28"
-----Have extra some work space around the mill to set tools i'm working with
-----Create more storage space for large tooling items
-----Easier to move around. I put wheels on the current stand and it is a SOB to move. i was wondering if they were to small/not rated high enough.

first picture is of the wheels i put on the current stand

second and third are a 3-D drawing i did of the new stand. I'm not finished i still have some more to work out

Andy
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  #2  
Old 06-14-2010, 12:15 AM
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Dave Lee Dave Lee is offline
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Your dimensions sound ok, Andy but, making it mobile is troubling. Mills and lathes don't do well on wheels. They're precision machines, that are meant to be placed in one spot, leveled/aligned and that's it. Moving them twists, tweaks and generally, knocks them out of alignment. If you need to move things out of the way, try putting less sensitive things like cabinets, tool chests, small machines ect. on wheels.

The other thing is, swarf gets everywhere. Keeping your tooling and accessories in drawers and cabinets will make for a much nicer enviroment to work in. I can't tell you the number of times I've went YAAHHH! when picking up a set of parallels or a collet that was full of those little needle chips. Putting them in a cabinet, solved all that. Just my 2 cents, for what it's worth.


Dave
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Old 06-14-2010, 01:08 AM
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And yes, your wheels were too small and sides are too weak.
My stand had wheels about like when it was delivered to me.
They had collapsed in on themselves.

I agree with Dave & I cut the wheels off & tossed them.
And lowered the stand 5 or 6 inches. Casters not only provide too little contact area with the floor but they also rotate in the vertical plane & shift the center of gravity and the balance of everything and that moves the stress points around.
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Old 06-14-2010, 01:52 AM
Andyman Andyman is offline
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I wouldn't/don't move the mill that much. it's just i don't own a cherry picker to move it when necessary i borrowed one from a buddy when i bought the mill up. I just don't have a lot of room in the garage so sometimes i have to juggle some stuff around and it makes it nice to have the mill on wheels.

The current stand i have leveling feet on. which is why i recessed the wheels so the feet didn't have to stick out much past the nut on the frame. i planned to try to do something like that with the new stand recess the wheels so maybe a quarter inch is past the plane of the bottom then i can crank down the leveling feet when i get it in position.

I also planned to put some plywood or something over the top to cover the opening to prevent chips from cover the area below.

Andy
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Old 06-14-2010, 03:00 AM
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I agree on no movement and no wheels. Find a spot you can live with and move something else. The added wheels shown are not good in that you have reduced the footprint and thus increased the hight of the COB.

I would be carefull about raising the mill. If you add an RT to your table it will increase 5" and lots of times clamping can raise it 2 or 3 inches more.

You have done a lot of planning on this and will be hard to redirect but please think on it awhile. Also if you build it like you are talking, sheet it and put in a door and drawers. It is easier to keep things clean as to clean them.
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Old 06-14-2010, 03:39 AM
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My mill/Drill is smaller then yours it sits on an 1/8" steel plate that is on a sheet of plywood.
Steel cross members also support the plywood.
The steel will limit oil contact with the plywood.
The plywood will limit some of the uneven pressure on the mill base (as not to twist the base).
Bottom shelf for holding heavier things to increase stability.
Height is set just right so you can sit on a shop stool and crank the handles.

The wheels are on out riggers, I was lucky they swivel 360 just barely missing the lower jackscrew legs.

You should also check the clearance of the hand wheels so your hand does not hit the tabletop when you are cranking the wheels.
If adding power feed make sure the motors don't hit the table (that's if the table is to wide).

Something I did not do but was in the back of my mind, was how far I wanted the back of the table hanging out.
In other words you can rotate the head 180º and clear the table, drilling holes in longer parts.
Assuming the table was made stable enough for rotating the head 180º.
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  #7  
Old 06-14-2010, 09:09 AM
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Andy, I would scrap the wheels as well. Levelling bolts are needed, but thats all. If you have to move it...and are desperate to do so, go borrow or rent a pallet jack and lift and move it with that.
That is ...if the bottom rungs/braces on the stand are strong enough to take some weight.
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Old 06-14-2010, 07:09 PM
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Andy, I fully understand the need to have to have almost everything in the shop (including machinery) to an extent, but wheels don't work well. For the price of a good set of casters, you can find a good used pallet jack on Craigslist and then everything in the shop becomes instantly mobile. I use 3" steel tube to make skids and everything gets bolted to the steel tube. 4X4 timber will do the same thing cheaper and the side benefit (unless you're short) is that everything is 3" higher.

The pallet jack is stored under almost any machine when not needed so it doesn't eat up any valuable floor space. I have found many other uses for the pallet jack and can honestly say that I don't know how I ever got along without having one years before. Try it, you'll like it
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  #9  
Old 06-15-2010, 11:06 PM
Andyman Andyman is offline
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I'm redesigning so i can use a pallet jack. Except now i don't believe i have strong enough material for the bottom rungs. i originally planned to use some bed frame material for that. So this will probably get pushed back farther on my list since i have no money to go buy some material. i recently got layed off and its not going so well with finding a new job. I would just work out of the garage but I'm worried about liability with jobs and not to mention i feel like i don't know enough to start doing that. I'm still young and have much to learn.

Andy
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Old 06-15-2010, 11:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andyman View Post
i originally planned to use some bed frame material for that.


Andy
Sorry about the job, Andy but you shouldn't weld old bed rails into a structure such as this. You might or might not get away with it. The stuff is too damned unpredictable & your talking about supporting a good bit of weight.

Bed rails
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