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martinf
07-17-2009, 11:10 PM
Hey all,
I'm wanting to use an old freon tank, a bit bigger than a basket ball, as a resevoir tank for a small air compressor. I've got one of those little oilless pumps to mount on it, and have a air switch 70 on and 100 off. So, I'd like to get a hundred pounds in it, but have no idea what the tank can handle. What do ya think?
~martin

Woodshed
07-17-2009, 11:15 PM
They are not design to be reused. I don't think it would be safe to put that much pressure in it. I was always told not to use them for air tank to fill flat tires. I think you are talking about the 30 or 50 lbs tanks.

migwelder05
07-17-2009, 11:15 PM
I know alot of people that use them as air tanks, is there a max rating on the tank?

martinf
07-17-2009, 11:21 PM
Nope, tank's been in my junkyard too long and sun faded.

Paychk
07-17-2009, 11:21 PM
The vapor pressure of R-12 is 135 psi (I think) if the tank isn't corroded internally you should be fine.

midmosandblasting
07-17-2009, 11:26 PM
Is it one of the old ones or one of the newer ones with the sheet metal blow point on the top ? I have used one for 40 years and still holds air and looks very rough rust wise.Yours may fail 1st time so pay your money and take your chances.

martinf
07-17-2009, 11:28 PM
It's definately an older one!

Jim-TX
07-17-2009, 11:29 PM
I've seen kits sold to adapt freon tanks to air tanks. Personally, I wouldn't be scared of it, but......:rolleyes:

martinf
07-17-2009, 11:33 PM
Perhaps I'll use my triedand true strategy of, when I'm just not sure about something, I operate it first kinda close in the shelter of my back hoe bucket (with me safely out of the blow up zone!

You guys are great--I ask this question and I've already gotten 7 responses in as many minutes. Some queries on soem sites I have to wait a long time before I get even one answer. Heck I've got a question out there on a Snow cat site that has been read 110 times and has not a single answer in 3 weeks...
thansk for the input.
~martin

migwelder05
07-17-2009, 11:41 PM
Oh forgot to say welcome aboard, feel free to jump right in. :)

cutter
07-17-2009, 11:48 PM
Martin, I also have an old freon tank that I've been using for 20 years with one of those cheap conversion kits.

Even so, I think your plan is wise - protect your self.
And be sure you use a relief valve, just in case the pressure switch ever fails.

martinf
07-18-2009, 12:20 AM
Great, it's clear to me that this is a do-able thing.
what does the conversion kit do?

Dave Lee
07-18-2009, 12:33 AM
The conversion kit contains a manifold that screws onto thr valve of the tank. It has a pressure gauge, safety valve, tire valve for filling the tank, a 3 foot hose and a tire chuck.

I've had one since sometime in the 80's, too. It still works but, it's a whole lot lighter than the portable Craftsman tank I bought, a few years ago. Makes me wonder, just how thin is that freon tank? :eek:


Dave

cutter
07-18-2009, 12:33 AM
The kit consists of a tapped alloy block that screws on to the freon valve. It allows for installing the included gauge, fill port (schraeder valve), relief valve and the hose.
That's just to make a portable air tank.

I've always installed a female quick connect on the hose so I can fill it straight from the compressor instead of blowing it up with an air hose via the schraeder valve. Much quicker.

Since your question was about using it as the compressor tank you could use a relief valve anywhere between the compressor head and the tank - like maybe a tee or quad that will allow for your gauge, pressure switch, etc.

Dave Lee
07-18-2009, 12:37 AM
Looks like I was a little quick, on the draw.:D

One thing I would add is, I haven't seen those conversion kits around for a very long time.

Dave

brucew
07-18-2009, 06:46 AM
Martin, I also have an old freon tank that I've been using for 20 years with one of those cheap conversion kits.



Me too. Been working for me for years.
Bruce

monte55
07-18-2009, 08:45 AM
Hey all,
I'm wanting to use an old freon tank, a bit bigger than a basket ball, as a resevoir tank for a small air compressor. I've got one of those little oilless pumps to mount on it, and have a air switch 70 on and 100 off. So, I'd like to get a hundred pounds in it, but have no idea what the tank can handle. What do ya think?
~martin

What color is the tank. If it was green it had r-22 which has to be able to be in a hot service truck which can easily exceed 125 degrees and the tank pressure would be higher than that. The newer tanks have a check valve not allowing one to refill the tank. The tanks are bare steel inside and are not protected against rust and that's why they are not recommended for air tanks. Compressed air has moisture and in time can rust and weaken the tank
and then give way if over pressurized which some numbnuts have done in the past. I don't think they sale the air kits for the freon tanks anymore. That would be a great liability. Thirty pound tanks won't hold much air. Fifty pound are much better. I've been in HVAC since 1971 and I've used them for air tanks with no problem But I only fill them to about 125 psi where as some shops with 2 stage units are running 175 psi. Be careful.
Nick

martinf
07-18-2009, 09:12 AM
If it was green it had r-22 which has to be able to be in a hot service truck which can easily exceed 125 degrees and the tank pressure would be higher than that.
Thirty pound tanks won't hold much air. Fifty pound are much better. I've been in HVAC since 1971 and I've used them for air tanks with no problem But I only fill them to about 125 psi where as some shops with 2 stage units are running 175 psi. Be careful.
Nick
Yep, mine's green.
I'll be careful to keep the pressure no more than 120.
thanks for the info,everyone.
~martin

Ironman
07-18-2009, 09:41 AM
I've got two tanks for refrigerant, which is identified as liquified natural gas(strange) that has a working pressure rating of 535 psi stamped into it. They look like 20# propane tanks, but heavy.

DrBob
07-18-2009, 10:17 AM
Welcome to the Forum! Another way to go is:


http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=41712


for about $30. I don't know how much a conversion kit costs but when you subtract that ......

Something to think about for sure.

DrBob

DrBob
07-18-2009, 10:40 AM
I've always installed a female quick connect on the hose so I can fill it straight from the compressor instead of blowing it up with an air hose via the schraeder valve. Much quicker.
.

If I'm thinking right, Cutter that means you have a male connector on the compressor. I've always seen the FEMALE on the compressor and subsequent hoses etc. lined up MALE at the compressor end and FEMALE at the far end. That way If you want to disconnect something the Female closes and keeps the tank pressure or pressure in the line.

Just curious.

DrBob

cutter
07-18-2009, 11:38 AM
If I'm thinking right, Cutter that means you have a male connector on the compressor. I've always seen the FEMALE on the compressor and subsequent hoses etc. lined up MALE at the compressor end and FEMALE at the far end. That way If you want to disconnect something the Female closes and keeps the tank pressure or pressure in the line.

Just curious.

DrBob
Not quite, Doc.
I use a simple male/male adapter.
Anything that stores air has a female QC, all hoses have male on one end, female on the other.
Any tool that uses air has a male inlet.
To fill a tank from the compressor I use the male/male adapter in between.

DrBob
07-18-2009, 11:46 AM
Not quite, Doc.
I use a simple male/male adapter.
Anything that stores air has a female QC, all hoses have male on one end, female on the other.
Any tool that uses air has a male inlet.
To fill a tank from the compressor I use the male/male adapter in between.

I was sitting at my desk in the office filling out #$%@#paperwork and, of course thinking about SFT. :)
I came to the same conclusion: that of course you would have to have a female on the storage tank as well, but I got back here too late to quietly delete my post :o:o

Memo to self:
Always engage brain before running mouth.

DrBob

kbs2244
07-18-2009, 12:50 PM
I have a little one that I have had kicking around for over 20 years.
It is real handy if you don't need a lot of air.
Just remember if you are thinking of tires that it will only fill untill the air pressure is equal in the tank and tire.
So the small tanks ar OK for wheelbarrows and garden tractors, but a car tire or bigger will need a biger tank.

cutter
07-18-2009, 01:02 PM
For several years one of the trailer tires had a slow leak.
After a week or two it would leak down to about 15 psi & one tankful would boost it right back up with air to spare.
That tire eventually healed itself; sometimes procrastination really does pay off. :)

I've also used one tank to run a brad nailer to tack up a piece of trim or maybe two on several occasions.
It's so much easier to wag around a tank than even my smallest compressor & in a couple of repair situations where there was no power in the house that came in handy.
I have one brad nailer that operates nicely on 40 - 60 psi; it's surprising how much work it can do with one tank.

USMCPOP
07-18-2009, 01:07 PM
Is this one of those lightweight disposable tanks or a heavier-duty one? I would be concerned about rusting on a thinner tank.

Jim-TX
07-18-2009, 06:18 PM
cutter, that male/male thing is something I've never thought of. I've always used a snap on (not the tool company) chuck to fill air tanks. The way you show is simple and good. Good tip!

cutter
07-18-2009, 08:11 PM
Thanks Jim. :)
It's also useful for evacuating my compressor tank when I want to scare the crap out of Bogie (the neighbor dog).

Now see there, Doc? I started to reply to you that asking questions is nearly always a good thing even if you do figure out the answer later & even if it seems like a minor thing.

mudbug
07-18-2009, 08:44 PM
Not quite, Doc.
I use a simple male/male adapter.
Anything that stores air has a female QC, all hoses have male on one end, female on the other.
Any tool that uses air has a male inlet.
To fill a tank from the compressor I use the male/male adapter in between.

And here I thought I was the only one that had made one of those little adapters (patent pending) to fill my air tanks with.:p

I've got a friend that had a box full of the parts to convert a tank to an air tank. He buys air tanks to convert into some sort of overflow tanks on oil/gas wells because the tank & kits are cheaper than any price he found for the tank alone (go figure?)

I see the conversion kits every once in a while for sale at "Big Lots" & maybe "Pep Boys". I'll check with my buddy & see if he still has the kits & wants to get rid of some,last time I was in his shop he had about 75 of the kits in a box and that was 6 months ago.

rustluver
07-18-2009, 09:09 PM
I've been using my portable tank made from a 30# R-22 jug for about 35 years without a problem. I don't need it too often but it sure is nice to have when I do. I don't think I have ever put more than about 90# of pressure in it.

Dave Lee
07-18-2009, 11:15 PM
I made one of those adapters to fill my tanks too. But, you know us Yankees, just gotta' get fancy about it. I took a brass ball valve and screwed a male fitting into each end. That way, I can turn everything on and off, right there, at the hook-up and don't have to run for the valve on the compressor or air tank.

I picked up a stainless steel tank at an auction once that, someone had put one of those kits on. It must be about 12 gallons. It looks like the ones you used to see advertised as war surplus in Popular Mechanics, after WW-2. It has narrow channels, about 1/2"X 1/8" welded along the length, over top of a strip of S/S, about 1/2"X 18GA., wrapped in a spiral around the tank, from top to bottom. I think they were listed as oxygen tanks for airplanes. I made a pressure pot sandblaster out of it.


Dave

DrBob
07-19-2009, 08:37 AM
Thanks Jim. :)
It's also useful for evacuating my compressor tank when I want to scare the crap out of Bogie (the neighbor dog).

Now see there, Doc? I started to reply to you that asking questions is nearly always a good thing even if you do figure out the answer later & even if it seems like a minor thing.

Wellsir, that's just what I like about SFT. Instead of a bunch of newbies asking the wrong questions and a bunch of self-proclaimed 'experts' blowharding as in several forums I could name; we have discussions like this which actually cause the newbie (me) to learn something. :)

Re: your tractor tire, Cutter I had a leaker on my leafblower that gave me fits for years - especially if it would come off the rim. Finally on the advice of my local mower repair guy I put an innertube into it. Problem solved.


DrBob

Charlie C
07-19-2009, 06:28 PM
This is the air tank I have, it is from a tire machine that was scraped out. The tank was saved and given to me.

The tall orange will be another air tank when I get it completed. It is an obsolete Ox tank. It should be good for a 1000# or so pressure but I will only put 120# in it max.

The fellow at my welding supply place gave me a Ox regulator that had had a crash. It looked like the tank had fallen over with the reg on it. The gages were trash and the connector between the tank and regulator was bent.

The gauges and reg go into the scrap pile but I saved the connector. The connector will have a air chuck on it. The thread is a 1/4 pipe thread.

DrBob
07-19-2009, 09:56 PM
This is the air tank I have, it is from a tire machine that was scraped out. The tank was saved and given to me.
The tall orange will be another air tank when I get it completed. It is an obsolete Ox tank. It should be good for a 1000# or so pressure but I will only put 120# in it max.


Charlie, I think you'll find that the oxygen tank with 120# of air in it will only hold a few cubic feet and probably will be too heavy and unwieldy to carry around. The other tank from the tire machine looks pretty good.

DrBob

Charlie C
07-19-2009, 11:36 PM
DrBob, I haven't calculated the size of the Ox tank but at a guess I would say that it will hold about as much as the other tank.

Now as to the tank being heavy and unwieldy, you are correct and I probably will not use it very much. I may go ahead and cut off the bottom and make a gong as I had previously planed.

fab it
07-20-2009, 08:24 AM
A few years back I made about 5 small sandblasters out of those tanks. They are all still in service today.